News Desk

The robot lawyer that overturned 160,000 parking tickets can now help you in 1,000 legal areas for free
16th July 2017 | dailymail.co.uk | Tech

Hiring a lawyer can be expensive, but a new robot could allow you to access the same advice for free.

DoNotPay, a robot that has been helping people to dispute around 160,000 parking tickets since 2015, has expanded its capabilities this month.

Transformer robots can be printed on demand in just 13 minutes
16th July 2017 | newscientist.com | Tech

From wire to finished product in less than 13 minutes: a new robot-builder is faster than most takeaways. It works by bending wire that already has motors attached into different shapes, using a process its designers call 1D printing. Once the robot has performed its job, it can simply be flattened and fed back into the system to be recycled into a new type of robot.

We’re close to banning nuclear weapons—killer robots must be next
16th July 2017 phys.org | Tech

On Friday, 122 countries voted in favour of the “Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons”. This new treaty sets the international norm that nuclear weapons are no longer morally acceptable.


Alt: Nations of the world agree to ban nuclear weapons – now what?
Alt: The UN Passes the First-Ever Treaty Banning Nuclear Weapons Worldwide

Congress Close to Approving a New Space Army
16th July 2017 gizmodo.com | Space

While fighting climate change and providing health care are both just too economically burdensome for America, members of the House believe there’s still enough cash to fund a space army that would fight off… the space enemies?

China tests self-sustaining space station in Beijing
16th July 2017 | reuters.com | Space

Sealed behind the steel doors of two bunkers in a Beijing suburb, university students are trying to find out how it feels to live in a space station on another planet, recycling everything from plant cuttings to urine.

First Object Teleported from Earth to Orbit
15th July 2017 | technologyreview.com | Space, Tech

Researchers in China have teleported a photon from the ground to a satellite orbiting more than 500 kilometers above

Teleportation has become a standard operation in quantum optics labs around the world. The technique relies on the strange phenomenon of entanglement. This occurs when two quantum objects, such as photons, form at the same instant and point in space and so share the same existence. In technical terms, they are described by the same wave function.

A 75,000-mile-wide hole has appeared on the sun – and experts warn it could knock out communications satellites and cause blackouts on Earth
15th July 2017 | dailymail.co.uk | Space

The sunspot, dubbed AR2665, is 74,560 miles (120,000 kilometres) wide – big enough to be seen from Earth.

Experts have warned that the spot is large enough to produce ‘M-class’ solar flares, which can cause radio blackouts on Earth, knock out communications satellites and create radiation storms.

In the Deep, Dark Sea, Corals Create Their Own Sunshine
15th July 2017 | nytimes.com | Animal Life, Earth

Corals that live up to hundreds of feet below the ocean’s surface have worked out a special arrangement with algae that’s mutually beneficial for the two.

Sunflowers work together to avoid overcrowding and soak up rays
15th July 2017 | newscientist.com | Earth

These plants swing both ways, you might say. Sunflowers growing densely in a field adopt a zigzag pattern, with neighbours leaning in opposite directions to grab as much light as possible.

The strategy – which other plants might be using as well, without anyone noticing – may someday give us a way to boost crop yields.

Plants turn caterpillars into cannibals
15th July 2017 | nature.com | Animal Life, Earth

Herbivorous pests often turn on each other when their food is of poor quality or it runs out. And some plants are known to affect the behaviour of their pests by making them more predatory towards other species. But until now it was unclear whether plants could directly cause caterpillar cannibalism.

Eat Better, Live Longer? Small Food Changes Make a Difference
15th July 2017 | livescience.com | Humans

Need an incentive to eat healthier? A new study suggests that people who make even small tweaks in their diet to make it healthier over time may live longer.


Related: Eating more vegetable protein may protect against early menopause
Related: Food scientists find cranberries may aid the gut microbiome

Australia Will Finally Ban Cosmetic Testing on Animals
15th July 2017 futurism.com | Animal Life

A bill proposed to the Australian House of Representatives would ban animal testing of industrial chemicals for use in cosmetics. This would have a positive effect on the lives of animals and set an example for other countries.

Elephant tourism is ‘fuelling cruelty’
15th July 2017 | bbc.co.uk | Animal Life

Millions of people want selfies riding elephants, or washing them, or patting their trunks. But according to a study carried out by World Animal Protection (WAP) across Asia this is helping to fuel a rise in elephants captured from the wild and kept for entertainment. The number in Thailand has increased by almost a third over the last five years.


Related: $10K reward offered for killer of rare Yellowstone wolf
Related: Record number of environmental activists killed around the world

Vaquita porpoise: Dolphins deployed to save rare species
15th July 2017 | bbc.co.uk | Animal Life

Mexico’s government says it plans to use dolphins trained by the US Navy to try to save the world’s most endangered marine species, the vaquita porpoise.

Sea Level Rise Will Flood Hundreds of Cities in the Near Future
15th July 2017 news.nationalgeographic.com | Earth

Sea level rise caused by global warming is usually cast as a doomsday scenario that will play out so far into the future, it’s easy to ignore. Just ask anyone in South Florida, where new construction proceeds apace.

This food forest on a barge in New York floats the idea of fresh food for cities
15th July 2017 | theverge.com | Earth

The idea behind Mattingly’s project is to bring foraging to the concrete jungle, where very little fresh produce is grown locally. Mostly, fresh fruits and vegetables are imported and thus expensive. There’s definitely a market for local food: New York City alone is estimated to have over $600 million worth of unmet annual demand for local food.

Daily alternative news articles at the GrahamHancock News Desk. Featuring science, alternative history, archaeology, Ancient Egypt, paranormal and much more. Check in daily for updates!