News Desk

‘Saddle-shaped’ universe could undermine general relativity
26th May 2017 phys.org | Space

Researchers have shown how singularities – which are normally only found at the centre of black holes and hidden from view – could exist in highly curved three-dimensional space.

Diving deep into the world of emergent gravity
26th May 2017 arstechnica.com | Space

The Universe is a strange place. Apart from the normal matter that we see around us, there appears to be a far larger amount of matter that we cannot see—the infamous dark matter. Even more puzzling, the Universe seems to be bathed in a similarly invisible dark energy, which drives the Universe to expand faster and faster. This all points to something missing from our understanding.

Space sperm produces healthy mice, raising prospect of future human settlement
26th May 2017 | theguardian.com | Animal Life, Humans, Tech

Reproduction may be possible in space, Japanese researchers have said, after freeze-dried sperm stored on the International Space Station for nine months produced healthy offspring.

3D-printed ovaries allow infertile mice to give birth
26th May 2017 | theguardian.com | Tech

Infertile mice have given birth to healthy pups after having their fertility restored with ovary implants made with a 3D printer.

Our Quest to Find a One-Sided Magnet Just Took an Unexpected Turn
26th May 2017 | sciencealert.com | Space, Tech

Of the many ‘white whales’ that theoretical physicists are pursuing, the elusive magnetic monopole – a magnetic with only one pole – is one of the most confounding.

Compared to the Higgs boson in terms of its potential impact on modern physics, the magnetic monopole has been on scientists’ minds for even longer.

Self-ventilating workout suit keeps athletes cool and dry
26th May 2017 phys.org | Tech

A team of MIT researchers has designed a breathable workout suit with ventilating flaps that open and close in response to an athlete’s body heat and sweat. These flaps, which range from thumbnail- to finger-sized, are lined with live microbial cells that shrink and expand in response to changes in humidity.


Related: Researchers design moisture-responsive workout suit

Experiments show that a few self-driving cars can dramatically improve traffic flow
26th May 2017 phys.org | Tech

The presence of just a few autonomous vehicles can eliminate the stop-and-go driving of the human drivers in traffic, along with the accident risk and fuel inefficiency it causes, according to new research. The finding indicates that self-driving cars and related technology may be even closer to revolutionizing traffic control than previously thought.

Toyota, Nissan, others get behind fuel cell push in Japan
26th May 2017 phys.org | Tech

Japan is backing a push for pollution-free vehicles that run on hydrogen and planning to build more hydrogen fueling stations so that fuel-cell vehicles on roads will grow to 40,000 by 2020, from the current handful.

Traffic-related air pollution linked to DNA damage in children
26th May 2017 | sciencedaily.com | Earth, Humans

Children and teens exposed to high levels of traffic-related air pollution have evidence of a specific type of DNA damage called telomere shortening, reports a new study.


Related: Farmworkers get sick after Trump’s EPA reverses Obama and approves poison that damages kids’ brains

Common artificial sweetener likely a safe, effective birth control and pesticide
26th May 2017 phys.org | Tech

Because of its quick lethality to freshly hatched flies and the ability to halt egg production, the artificial sweetener behind Truvia could be a potent but safe pesticide, according to a new study by Drexel University researchers.


Related: How toxic pesticides in ‘insect-friendly’ plants sold in garden centres could be killing endangered bees

Did Eternity Obsessed Ancient Egyptians Know How to Prevent Pregnancy?
26th May 2017 | ancient-origins.net | Ancient

It is hard to believe that the Ancient Egyptians, a culture completely infatuated with the preservation of life after death, would be concerned with the prevention of pregnancy. But they were one of the first ancient cultures to successfully employ birth control methods.

Cartouche of the Last Pharaoh of Egypt Found at Illegal Dig Under Home in Abydos
26th May 2017 | ancient-origins.net | Ancient

A team of Egyptian archaeologists found a cartouche of the last native Egyptian pharaoh under the home of a man in Abydos, Egypt. The man and his accomplices were doing an illegal excavation underneath the old mud-brick home.

Tool sharpens focus on Stone Age networking in the Middle East
26th May 2017 | sciencenews.org | Ancient

A new chemical analysis finds that this 41,000- to 32,000-year-old obsidian tool, previously unearthed in a Syrian rock-shelter, was transported more than 700 kilometers. That means that long-distance movement of obsidian into the Middle East occurred much earlier than previously thought, researchers say.

Earliest evidence of Aboriginal occupation of Australian coast discovered
25th May 2017 | theguardian.com | Ancient

Archaeologists find artefacts in a cave on Western Australia’s Barrow Island dating back more than 50,000 years, providing one of the earliest age brackets for the settlement of Australia


Alt: 50,000-year-old ‘Atlantis of the South’ discovered in Australia

Do humans come with a built-in sense of obligation to one another?
25th May 2017 | csmonitor.com | Humans

A study finds that children as young as three and a half years old display an understanding of shared commitments, adding to a growing body of evidence that humans are a uniquely cooperative species.

Humanizing, harmonizing effects of music aren’t a myth
25th May 2017 phys.org | Humans

Jake Harwood turned his lifelong hobby as a musician into a scholarly question: Could the sharing of music help ease interpersonal relations between people from different backgrounds, such as Americans and Arabs?

Being an Only Child Can Actually Change The Structure of Your Brain
25th May 2017 | sciencealert.com | Humans

Scientists have discovered that being an only child doesn’t just lead to behavioural differences that can set kids apart from those with siblings – it actually affects a child’s brain development, too.

Daily alternative news articles at the GrahamHancock News Desk. Featuring science, alternative history, archaeology, Ancient Egypt, paranormal and much more. Check in daily for updates!