News Desk

The United States Officially Withdraws From UNESCO
13th October 2017 | | Ancient

And so ends America’s efforts to list some of the most distinctive ancient earthworks and irreplaceable historical treasures in the world on the UNESCO World Heritage list. The official effective date of withdrawal is December 2018.  Hopefully we can still celebrate these ancient sites, cherish them, protect them, and educate the world about them.

The Mysterious Tribe of Blue Eyed Native Americans
13th October 2017 | Ancient, Humans

History holds many oddities that we may never fully understand, either through incomplete documentation, disinterest at the time, or simply a big question mark that hangs over all. Among these are mysterious tribes of people that have been encountered and confronted in all corners of the globe, often vanishing before we really understand them and leaving us perplexed at just who they were or where their origins lie. One such tribe was a mysterious group of Native Americans who appeared to explorers as something quite European in nature, although their ways and beginnings have always been cloaked in shadows. Known mostly from historical accounts, their origins remain murky, their lineage uncertain, and they are a historical curiosity we may never fully understand.

Adélie Penguin Disaster in Antarctic: Just Two Chicks Survive in 18,000 Breeding Pairs
13th October 2017 | | Animal Life

A colony of about 40,000 Adélie penguins in Antarctica has suffered a catastrophic breeding event.  All but two chicks have died of starvation this year. It is the second time in just four years that such devastation – not previously seen in more than 50 years of observation – has been wrought on the population.

Centuries of Volcano Death Statistics, Newly Analysed
13th October 2017 | Earth

New research digs into historic volcano fatalities to explore how, where and whom a volcano is most likely to kill. Living near an active volcano is something of a hazard. According to the study, around 278,000 people have died since the year 1500 as a result of volcanic activity, which averages about 540 people a year for the past 517 years.

Evolution: The Beneficiaries of Mass Extinction
13th October 2017 | | Ancient, Animal Life

Mass extinctions were followed by periods of low diversity in which certain new species dominated wide regions of the supercontinent Pangaea, reports a new study.

New Headphones Will Allow You to Understand 40 Languages
13th October 2017 | | Tech

Google has revealed a pair of wireless headphones containing built-in language translation software with the ability to translate between 40 different languages — in real time.  The headphones work in conjunction with its Pixel 2 handset.

DNA Study: South Americans Did Not Populate Easter Island
13th October 2017 | | Ancient, Humans

Researchers from UC Santa Cruz analysed bone fragments from the ancient skeletal remains of five people, which were excavated in the 1980s,to make their discovery.

DNA Study: Newfoundland Populated Multiple Times by Distinct Groups
13th October 2017 | Ancient, Humans

Indigenous people have been on the far northeastern edge of Canada for most of the last 10,000 years, moving in shortly after the ice retreated from the Last Glacial Maximum. Archaeological evidence suggests that people with distinct cultural traditions inhabited the region at least three different times with a possible hiatus for a period between 2,000 and 3,000 years ago.

How the People of Wales Became Welsh
13th October 2017 | | Ancient, Humans

Britain in the early Middle Ages was very different to the country it is now. Rather than England, Scotland and Wales, the island consisted of numerous kingdoms, the fate and fortune of which fluctuated, as some kings gained lordship over others, some smaller kingdoms were swallowed by their larger neighbours and others fell to foreign invaders – including Vikings, in the ninth and tenth centuries.

The Pop-Cultural Heritage of Terrorism, Treasure Hunting, and Trafficking
13th October 2017 | | Humans, Tech

The looting and destruction of antiquities and archaeological sites has plagued countries facing conflict and instability for decades.  As with any monumental global challenge, the recent crises have become the topics of popular culture stretching from television comedies, to drama, and even videogames.

Obsidian Artifacts Found at Maya Site in Guatemala
13th October 2017 | | Ancient

42 obsidian artifacts have been found at the Maya site of Ceibal in Guatemala.  The precious rocks were thought to hold special spiritual or supernatural significance for Preclassical Mayan people.

How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes
13th October 2017 | | Animal Life, Earth

Hurricane Maria decimated Puerto Rico. With sustained winds of 155 miles per hour, much of the US territory has been without power for weeks. Many residents lack running water, hospitals have been limping along on backup generators, and the island’s agriculture has been essentially flattened. The toll on local wildlife remains far from appreciated, but it’s clear from Maria and other hurricanes that some animal populations suffer from big storms—while others thrive.

Japanese Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After Tsunami
13th October 2017 | | Animal Life, Earth

Marine species survived rafting thousands of kilometers on debris swept into the water by the giant wave off Japan in 2011, scientists say.  Having traversed roughly 7,000 kilometers across the Pacific, the material carried with it living animals from 289 Japanese coastal marine species.

Dutch Company Training Crows to Trade Littered Cigarette Butts for Treats
13th October 2017 | | Animal Life, Earth, Tech

Worldwide, about 4.5 trillion cigarettes are littered on streets each year.  A Dutch company is training crows to drop cigarette butts in a ‘Crowbar,’ which scans the item to confirm it’s a cigarette butt, and then gives the crow a food reward to reinforce the behavior.

Partial Statues of King Psamtik I, Ramses II, and Ra-Horakhti Discovered in Egypt
13th October 2017 | | Ancient

Archaeologists working in Souq al-Kharnis in the Matariya district of Egypt have uncovered a large number of fragments of the lower part of a King Psamtik I colossus, fragments of a colossal statue of King Ramses II, and part of the statue of god Ra-Horakhti.

Proposed Green Eco-Resort in Philippines Merges Science with Beauty
13th October 2017 | | Earth, Tech

A Paris architect has unveiled a plan for a new eco-resort preserving ecology in the Philippines while respecting the area’s unique ecosystems and indigenous cultures. Perched on the edge of a gorgeous cove, the imaginative Nautilus Eco-Resort takes inspiration from the seashell, and is built in a pleasing series of spirals that spin out into the water. Even the hotels and apartment towers themselves are seashell shaped, all of which adheres to the Fibonacci sequence, a symbol of balance and harmony.

Daily alternative news articles at the GrahamHancock News Desk. Featuring science, alternative history, archaeology, Ancient Egypt, paranormal and much more. Check in daily for updates!