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3 months ago
mhgaffney
Good Capricorn, Thanks for posting! I'm very pleased to get a look at the winged lion. This god long predates the Romans. The Temple of the Winged Lion in Petra, Jordan is aligned with the Bering Sea north pole position that was current 120,000 years BP. How do we arrive at this date? The Bering Sea north pole position correlates with the oldest stratigraphic layer of the bone caves of B
Forum: Mysteries
3 months ago
mhgaffney
hello Jørgen, Thanks for the comment. I am in full agreement with your post. Hope you enjoy my book! Mark
Forum: Author of the Month
4 months ago
mhgaffney
Hello Michael, You make excellent points! Obviously, you have been thinking along similar lines. Your suggested pole position on the west side of Greenland is close to the locations Mark Carlotto and I have identified - and which correlate with the second oldest stratigraphic layer in the bone caves of Britain. No doubt, other former north pole locations remain unknown to us. Each time an
Forum: Author of the Month
4 months ago
mhgaffney
Ray, You are welcome! This last month has been great. I have very much enjoyed the dialogue here. Very happy to see the high interest in Hapgood. No question, we are well into the biggest paradigm shift in science since the apple dropped on Isaac Newton. Very interesting days ahead.
Forum: Author of the Month
4 months ago
mhgaffney
Michael, We have only begun to study the Nazca lines in Peru. We are only starting to understand them. I have not flown over them to view them from the air - yet - so for me this is a high priority. Based on what I have already learned, I do not believe they are random creations. I suspect that each of the Nazca lines may be significant. And because there are hundreds of them, our challenge is
Forum: Author of the Month
4 months ago
mhgaffney
Michael, Yes, there probably have been more than four world ages. There may have been five, six, or even more. We simply do not know, at this time. Each epoch is unique because of the distinctive civilization(s) which existed in that era. Some of the civilizations no doubt survived from one age to the next. It came down to the luck of the draw. If the civilization was based in a region far
Forum: Author of the Month
4 months ago
mhgaffney
Michael, Charles Darwin estimated that the Andes had risen 8,000 feet in elevation, of which a 2,000 - 3,000 foot rise had occurred in the recent past. One of the first things visitors to Peru invariably notice is the extensive system of agricultural terraces. They are everywhere, and rise at least 2,500 feet above Lake Titicaca. Today, the system is almost completely abandoned, because corn a
Forum: Author of the Month
4 months ago
mhgaffney
Michael, Thank you for bringing this to my attention. It's definitely worth looking into. No doubt, much of the evidence for crustal displacement has not yet been identified. These changes are global, so the evidence must be all around us. We need only learn to recognize it.
Forum: Author of the Month
4 months ago
mhgaffney
Jazzmumbles, I present multiple lines of evidence in my new book that crustal displacement is a real phenom. You can read about some of this evidence here. No need to buy the book. My current article "Holographic Britain" presents a synopsis of the evidence unearthed in the bone caves of Britain. Also check out my article from September 2019, The Oldest Anomaly in Science:
Forum: Author of the Month
4 months ago
mhgaffney
Michael, You raise an interesting question. When the crust moves, everything on the crust, including ice caps, will be carried along and move with the crust. If the ice cap moves into the temperate zone, the ice will rapidly melt in these regions. Meanwhile, new ice caps will begin to form in regions that were not previously covered with ice but which have moved into the polar zones. So, an ic
Forum: Author of the Month
4 months ago
mhgaffney
Michael, if your question is, when did the last crustal shift occur, my answer is: at the end of the Pleistocene. I refrain from estimating the date of the event. However, I believe that we will know this, soon enough. And yes, I am aware of some of the myths that possibly refer to slippage of the earth's crust. I would be interested to learn more about the Chinese myth that the country moved
Forum: Author of the Month
4 months ago
mhgaffney
Yes, Flem-Ath followed Hapgood on the Hudson's Bay pole position. So does Carlotto in his book. But I suspect this position was current during the penultimate ice age 130,000 - 150,000+ years ago. Not during the LGM. I have not investigated the expanding earth theory. But I am open-minded about it. There seem to be hints that the earth has grown in size.
Forum: Author of the Month
4 months ago
mhgaffney
hello Michael, I can give you the benefit of my research. Hapgood had to abandon his proposed mechanism that a growing ice cap caused the crust of the earth to slip toward the equator. Because when he crunched the numbers he found that no matter how much ice accumulates at the pole it still would not be enough to cause a displacement. But even though he gave up his mechanism he continued to find
Forum: Author of the Month
4 months ago
mhgaffney
Most of the circle - spirals are approximately .2 miles across. One is .4 miles across - so these are large structures, and definitely artificial. There are also other mysterious structures and lines in the vicinity.
Forum: Mysteries
4 months ago
mhgaffney
hi lost in lagarita, You are correct! I just checked the site using Google Earth Pro. There are a number of what look like medicine wheels in the area. I counted four of them about five miles N-NE of Flook Lake. There's another one about 1.6 miles NW of the lake, and several more about 1 mile SW of the lake. This is my backyard. I live in southern Oregon. So, I will have to make a tri
Forum: Mysteries
4 months ago
mhgaffney
p.s. I forgot to thank you for sharing.
Forum: Author of the Month
4 months ago
mhgaffney
Ray, I will take a look at the mysteries thread. Pouring blocks would appear to offer many advantages to cutting and hauling them. Pouring would also easily explain the tight fitting blocks, including the many sided polygonal blocks in Cusco. I have no expertise in the use of solar reflectors, however, so I will refrain from commenting further. I saw clear evidence in Egypt that saws w
Forum: Author of the Month
4 months ago
mhgaffney
Ray, It took me like four sittings to get through it. I'm still digesting it, also. Mark
Forum: Author of the Month
5 months ago
mhgaffney
Seasmith, The crust of the earth moved 1657 miles during the last event at the close of the Pleistocene. That is almost 24° of latitude. My field experience has been limited to three tours of ancient sites. But I tried to make the most of those trips. I'm not familiar with OSL dating so I best not comment. In general, however, the dating issue is problematic. There have been controvers
Forum: Author of the Month
5 months ago
mhgaffney
hi Seasmith, Forgive me if your post was not a question, but I'm reading it that way. The first of many mistakes I made investigating the archeological alignments that support Hapgood's theory was assuming that all of the ancient sites were aligned with equal accuracy. Not so. There is the widest imaginable range of accuracy. Some sites, like the Tower of Babel, miss the pole position by a hun
Forum: Author of the Month
5 months ago
mhgaffney
I’d like to share a startling discovery I made a few days ago, thanks to a recently posted film about the Great Pyramid. Here is the link: The film was produced by Fehmi Krasniqi and introduces a novel theory about pyramid construction that might turn out to be correct. I highly recommend the movie even though I take issue with Krasniqi on a number of points. The film is very long, an
Forum: Author of the Month
5 months ago
mhgaffney
hi Open Mind, If I am not mistaken, Hancock and Bauval covered this in their book The Message of the Sphinx. Regards, Mark
Forum: Author of the Month
5 months ago
mhgaffney
Ray, I was fortunate to travel with Brien Foerster on three of his tours in 2018 and 2019: to Peru, Mexico and Egypt. Brien's an excellent tour guide. I learned a lot from him. :-) Mark
Forum: Author of the Month
5 months ago
mhgaffney
Ray, I think we could be talking about multiple events. I have followed the interesting dialogue between Graham and the geologist Randall Carlson about the Younger Dryas event which I agree could have been due to an impact or a series of impacts. I am also aware that Graham and Robert Bauval are on record that 12,500 years BP is an alternative possibility for the start of construction of the G
Forum: Author of the Month
5 months ago
mhgaffney
Susan, No one knows for sure how long a crustal displacement event takes. At this point it's all conjecture. All the same, assuming that these events are caused by earth encounters with a passing object like a large comet, the time frame would have to be compressed. A comet flyby of earth takes about twelve hours. That would certainly wreak cataclysmic changes to earth. Some months ago, G
Forum: Author of the Month
5 months ago
mhgaffney
hi Ray, The time frame for my book is the last 120,000 years, as determined by the dating of fossils from the bone caves of Britain. In 1998, a hippo bone from Kirkdale cave was dated to 121,000 years BP using the uranium method. Britain enjoyed a subtropical climate at this time, not because the planet was warmer than at present but because Britain was then at the latitude of north Africa. T
Forum: Author of the Month
5 months ago
mhgaffney
Hapgood thought the crustal displacements occur over a period of years. However, his thinking evolved and in his 1970 book The Path of the Pole, Hapgood shows a degree of ambivalence about the duration of the events. I believe they happen quickly and are definitely catastrophic events. A cometary encounter would last about 12 hours.
Forum: Author of the Month
5 months ago
mhgaffney
Susan, My personal view is that large comets come close enough to earth to affect our planet. These are rare events and happen at great intervals of time. We have no scientific knowledge of these events because the 500 year history of science is much too short a timeframe to know what is possible. There are no historical records from the remote past. I do not have an opinion about how the
Forum: Author of the Month
5 months ago
mhgaffney
Hello Seasmith, I think you are not understanding what I mean by the meridian of maximum displacement (MoMD). Charles Hapgood coined the expression, and I discovered new evidence specifically pertaining to the last crustal displacement event which I believe occurred at the end of the Pleistocene. Charles Hapgood theorized that the relentless buildup of an ice cap at a pole might become mass
Forum: Author of the Month
5 months ago
mhgaffney
Hello Yve, Thank you for the kind words. Back in about 2006, I began posting on a Denver Bronco fan club website. I took it on because the crowd that frequents the place is the most conservative, backward thinking, and dense segment of the US populace. I went there as a kind of penance to try to make a difference. I have a deep masochistic streak. Anyway, being here now on Graham's site feels li
Forum: Author of the Month
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