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7 weeks ago
MDaines
Yve, Here’s one you might find amusing, involving the word play I came across in the re-translating of The Story of Sukurru. It will also serve as a reply to Seasmith who is correct concerning ZU as 'know'. This one in context is a backward reference to Odysseus – normal because he was homeward bound at the time. It takes place on a cosmic vessel and the hero is not identified. There is a ref
Forum: Mysteries
7 weeks ago
MDaines
Yve writes This may be of more interest to Edmond, but this phrase leapt out at me. >>Line 97 of The Story of Sukurru, aka The Instructions of Shuruppak: Place a man at the mouth of the milk-churning ocean and give him a beer.<< I don't know if you are familiar with the Churning the Milk Sea of Hindu legend. Odd it mentions the Nectar. I also found this about what
Forum: Mysteries
8 weeks ago
MDaines
Edmond writes I use the label 'Mixer' for one of the sixteen archetypes in art and other media. Type 14 Mixer's optional features (in sequence from more frequently recurrent to less), include: /ingress /egress (a purely spatial feature in art and built sites), /time (eg Seshat, including space and energy), /transform (honey, brew, ritual), /tree /herb (probably flower too, but I have not tes
Forum: Mysteries
8 weeks ago
MDaines
Thanos writes ....You might want to note that when you make these claims of "fact". Caveat emptor. Dear Thanos, Ah! Perhaps I should write 'Pyramid stems from Sumerian PIR which stems from PIE root'... Etymology dictionaries use ‘from PIE root’ an awful lot you will find. Of course, what it means is that they really don’t know but are relying on an unproven academic across-the-b
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Thanos writes Thank you, but what I questioned is whether she had a source for her claim that the word "pyramid" (the English translation of the the Latin "pyramis" from the Greek "puramis") "stems partially from the Sumerian PIR" or is this her interpretation. Which the Egyptian word for pyramid is "Mer" taking us even farther away from whatever
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Audrey writes Fascinating Hello Audrey, The ePSD site is that of the University of Pennsylvania. It didn't occur to me that Thanos was unsure of that information and I would not have thought to post Wikipedia as a source for fear of ridicule so thank you for that. Come to think of it, my credibility having been questioned here in the past by people who appeared to have no desire to actually l
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Thanos writes Do you have a source for this claim, if so please provide it, or is this your own interpretation? Thanos, I do indeed have a source and no, in this case, it was not even 'my own translation' which might be the wording applicable to a phrase taken from a cuneiform transliteration. I gave three separate words along with two phonetic values for 'sun'. But perhaps you are referr
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Yve writes I always stress Pyre in the Greek word pyramid, as it doesn't mean it was alight necessarily but flammable materials. Hello Yve, I haven't been following this thread very closely but this might interest you. The Greeks didn't take their language from the Egyptian. Pyramid stems partially from Sumerian PIR which is one phonetic form of UD, the sun. This is what it looks like as the
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Seasmith writes:Beer and bread, the perfect combination for to entrain the local populace, by the pyramid builders, for long term projects. There was a program in the states at one time called "Work for Welfare" . ~ add a little milk and honey... Hello Seasmith, Yes, it looks like we’re being headed back that way. Enough to buy a crust of bread and the promise of some honey beer
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
All those grinding stones found at Gobekli Tepe and now a brewery at Abydos while linguists are still wondering about the origin of the name. As I’ve written elsewhere , ‘beer’ is Sumerian in origin, evident thanks to the pictogram, the sound of it, and even the meaning given in Sumerian lexicons. BE / BI The word became synonymous with life through the fermentation process
Forum: Mysteries
3 months ago
MDaines
Engbren writes: It is presently unknown who invented the division of the circle into 360 degrees, but thought likely to be of Babylonian origin. I am interested in any serious scholarship on the arguments for and against the knowledge of the degrees in Egypt. Specifically, the older periods. Hello Engbren, Although not an answer to your question concerning the Egyptians, this might be of int
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
MDaines
Yve writes Yes, thank you it was very interesting. I read about the Sabians for the first time. I loved the idea of sitting in firelight and seeing the carvings seem to have life in them. My curiosity was sparked by a documentary I saw a few days ago. I did not realise how tall the stones are. The researcher showed the figure of a fallen man at the very bottom right of the Vulture stone and specu
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
MDaines
Thanos writes Why don't you cite the source of this "ancient quote"? By "ancient" I assume you mean Arab writings from c. 750-1050 AD. Hello Thanos, i thought it might interest Yve. What difference does the original language of it make - or even the date for that matter? Clearly, it was not Sumerian or contemporary to the Sabians. And we both know that secondary sources a
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
MDaines
Hello Yve, Unfortunately, the Gobekli Tepe site was covered over by a tarpaulin when I visited. We had to either sit or kneel to look and take photos, and it was quite dark. There is a reconstituted circle in the museum. One thing that stood out was that the carvings are really shallow, more so than I expected, perhaps an effect of time bur it seemed to me that they were originally intended to b
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
MDaines
There is a lineage all the way from Gobekli Tepe to the Roman era under Mithraism Hello GoodCap, I agree with the broad lines of that statement and would add that the style of the Cramond Lioness’ head is more than reminiscent of the numerous feline heads found at Gobekli Tepe. I saw the Gobekli totem in the museum at Sanliurfa. It’s too damaged to see much detail, but there is a huma
Forum: Mysteries
6 months ago
MDaines
Hello again, Brian Not sure what you mean by the philology of Sumerian KIK being complicated. It has the given meanings 'wheat', 'troublesome', and 'sick'. I wasn't attempting to link it to kukao, but to kykeon which, as far as I can tell, might have been pronounced 'kik' at some point. On the contrary, it seems to me that the problem might well be between two words of ancient Greek and whether
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
MDaines
Re-posted under 'Gnosis' Hello again, Brian Not sure what you mean by the philology of Sumerian KIK being complicated. It has the given meanings 'wheat', 'troublesome', and 'sick'. I wasn't attempting to link it to kukao, but to kykeon which, as far as I can tell, might have been pronounced 'kik' at some point. On the contrary, it seems to me that the problem might well be between two words o
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
MDaines
18. Gnosis
Hello Brian, The source of Greek kykeon might well be Sumerian symbol KIK/GIG which is given as ‘wheat’, 'sick' and ‘troublesome’* in the lexicons and can also be sourced as ‘black’ – all words associated with ergot of course. Allegro mentions GIG in The Sacred Mushroom And The Cross but misses that connection altogether. I have to admit that I almost did too. Nevertheless, his point that GI
Forum: Author of the Month
7 months ago
MDaines
Shawn writes: I recently learned that “skeptic” Jason Colavito bothered to take time out from his busy schedule to insult me and the five-part Hopi-related series I wrote (as a labor of love) between 2016 and 2019. Colavito always seems poised to provide a solid dose of ill will and to treat readers to his unfailingly superior intellectual opinion on any topic – as long as it falls within the
Forum: Mysteries
8 months ago
MDaines
Lee McGiffen writes Oh, London Real TV, the David Icke channel. Gimme a break. Plandemic Indoctornation:
Forum: Gunpowder, Treason & Plot
8 months ago
MDaines
8 months ago
MDaines
In my quest for the truth about Sumero-Egyptian Osiris, I have been looking once again into mentions of the great Mesopotamian fish-god and the various related translated names. Jason Colavito’s blog is impressive on that score and I take the liberty of copying a relatively short excerpt from his page concerning Oannes of Berosus fame. I have said somewhere hereabouts that Jason is a highly inter
Forum: Mysteries
8 months ago
MDaines
Fear ends where truth begins.
Forum: Gunpowder, Treason & Plot
8 months ago
MDaines
Censored on Youtube.
Forum: Gunpowder, Treason & Plot
9 months ago
MDaines
There are many Sumerian proverbs dating to the Old Babylonian period ca.1900-1600 BC. They go unnoticed by the general public but have been very useful in my investigation into the truth about those ancient texts and symbols. Some, if not all, can be understood as much older, possibly by as much as a thousand years. The proof of this lies in several lines from the text of The Story of Sukurru, ca
Forum: Mysteries
9 months ago
MDaines
Hello Dune, Thanks for the links. Both very interesting but particularly The Horn in Antiquity - for me anyway. I've written quite a bit about the significance of the bull/auroch and horns in Sumerian texts (in Before Babel), but the subject is vast and there is always something new to be gleaned. One example is EL, source of the later god, which is made up of two symbols, SAL, the feminine,
Forum: Mysteries
9 months ago
MDaines
Hello Dune, Sumerian MU, ‘age’, ‘name’, ‘fame’ and, according to me, syllable of all ‘movement’, is given multiple times in the lexical lists with UN (7 pages on ePSD): MU-UN, the age of the people, the fame of the land. Also given numerous times with NA, ‘heavy’ and ‘stone’ as MU-NA. Strangely, no-one else finds any reason to suggest that these symbols are the origin of ‘moon’, and also of anci
Forum: Mysteries
9 months ago
MDaines
Lobsang writes We are both using two different approaches. Hence, different results. That doesn't strike me as being the case. As far as I can tell, you haven't been researching the ultimate source of the names of the deities you were mentioning. I simply came along to offer up that source and the meanings for the purpose of adding some useful information to your research. Thank you for t
Forum: Mysteries
9 months ago
MDaines
Lobsang writes I doubt if IN-DARA is the root of Indra. I already found Indra's Sumerian counterpart, and he does not go by the name IN-DARA. That is a surprising pronouncement from my perspective, Lobsang. I gave the root of a name that is pronounced In-dra as coming from collocated symbols that are clearly important as a pair in Sumerian literary texts and pronounced IN-DARA. I honestly can'
Forum: Mysteries
9 months ago
MDaines
Lobsang writes I have never heard of a Sumerian deity named IN-DARA. It’s certainly not listed in any deity list. Hello again, I'm afraid you misunderstand what I wrote. I am not saying that there ever was a Sumerian deity named IN-DARA. I am saying that the Hindu deity very probably got her name from this language known to us today as Sumerian, and that it is possible to gain more understan
Forum: Mysteries
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