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15 years ago
Deep1
Dave? Hello Dave, I don't think I can do that... HAL (aka Deep)
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Deep1
We should drop this then - the third subject you have had to "drop" in this thread?
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Deep1
Hmmm, Who is she? Do not hide behind metaphors... The South American 3-eyed goddess that predates Durga and Kali. With proof that they existed in the imagination before 3000 BC. :-) Deep
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Deep1
In India, She is called Durga. She has her third eye in the middle of her forehead (Kundalini). Please give me proof that she originated in South America. Thanks, Deep
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Deep1
Hello Kat, Thank you for the follow up. I appreciate your passion in getting to the bottom of all this. Like I mentioned, I can attest to the Sanskrit part, but not the rest. My only observation would be, given your extensive contacts, do you by any chance know an old tribal or village elder? I learned ancient Sanskrit from such people, not the scholars. The lists I posted were the result of
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Deep1
I received this list from the same source as the link I posted earlier in the same thread. It was originally published in a comparative study called "The Ayar-Incas" by Miles Poindexter. I have also run into the same list in Gene Matlock's works. It struck me as genuine because I know Sanskrit, and can attest to the accuracy of the Sanskrit portion. Languages evolve and change over time
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Deep1
Here are a few examples of linguistic similarities between the languages of Central America and India: Quichua (meaning) Sanskrit (meaning) akapana(clouds colored by sun) aka (painting) chani (price) jani (produce) chinkat (jaguar) sinha (lion) chirau (resplenden
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Deep1
Madonna, There is some info here you might find helpful: Deep
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Deep1
Hi, I'm curious at what research supports Mayan culture spreading to India instead of the other way around. I have only run into a few examples, as quoted below. From what I know, the Maya were too recent an addition to history for that to have been the case, compared to India's 5000 years or more (some Indian epics like the Ramayana describe planetary (star) pictures that last happened around
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Deep1
Getting carried away? No big deal... Here's me doing the same... Dawn curls around my mountain like the surf’s tongue as the mind slips the moorings to soar with the doves past the colonial reefs held in coral bondage past the shallow lagoons to roar with the breakers speaking their language of live history. The rain is but a spray of sunshine misting light: the lowlamps stutter the mountain l
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Deep1
In my opinion, our analysis is too micro-centered. We can map the genome of the tree, yet miss the forest because it is big. And yet we look for answers where the questions dissolve when phrased correctly. We are very good at looking through microscopes. We are very bad at stepping back far enough to have to use a telescope... We use the left side of our brains to paint a picture to others, th
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Deep1
I'm not sure if any stone circle (using similar stones) we recontruct will necessarily mirror these results. My understanding is that sites like Stonehenge, some temples in Egypt and India, parts of Angkor, some spiritual monuments in America (like the Black Hills in South Dakota) were chosen by their folks for their electromagnetic properties (courtesy eddies, whirlpools and waterfalls of the
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Deep1
I have a better hypothesis that completely explains the correlations between the 1995 CD ROM and Plato, and can be summarized in one sentence instead of 8 web-pages and 6 pdf downloads: "The illustrators of the 1995 'Ancient Civilizations' were strongly influenced by the imagery contained in the Altantis dialogues of Plato." Any takers to this hypothesis? Please speak your mind... C
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Deep1
I think we are speculating with most of the posts. The possibility of them being descendents of a long-lost tribe exists (whether THE lost tribe or not.) We are creatures of short lives and shorter memories. We should not belittle those with no keyboards. Let us wait and see if this genetic and social investigation holds any lighthouses. Let us not pre-judge, because of their location, for to
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
Deep1
Actually, you have a point Fisherman. Adam's bridge is a chain of shoals, that I suspect, owe their origins to when Sri Lanka separated from the Indian mainland. It is this chain that is evident in the satellite photos. It is not inconceivable that a human-built bridge once existed over these shoals and shallows, because folk-memory would ensure that that is the best path to take for a bridge to
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
Deep1
In addition, I forgot to mention that the Ramayana contains several chapters devoted to a detailed description of the building of the bridge to Lanka (as it was called then). They include how the stones were transported, logistical problems, how thousands of volunteers joined Rama in this quest, and so on...
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
Deep1
Hi Everyone, Actually, the dating of the epic Ramayana is controversial. Recent Vedic scholars, following astonomical clues (the positions of particular stars and planets mentioned during battles in the Ramayana) place the historical age at around 7500 BCE. The Vanar or Monkey Army, it has been theorized, were actually the darker-skinned locals of Dravidian descent, the same folks who built th
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
Deep1
While speaking of the manifest and unmanifest, are you familiar with the image of Shiva (Yahvah) Ardhanari (Half Woman)? This is a familiar portrait of the human form in yin/yang pose. This sculpture in Elephanta shows the human spirit as half female and male, while the face in the front is without gender. The full carving includes the female half with a breast, and the male form without one. The
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
Deep1
Hi All, Mahabalipuram is the tip of the iceberg. I grew up in different parts of India, ususally in coastal towns, and having always had a fascination with the sea, the local fishermen were my best friends. I have always been amazed at how accurate local mythology is regarding submerged structures. In ancient cultures (those that have not seen huge migrations of peoples) the fishermen (or local
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
Deep1
That was cute, Mark. If you do not see the difference between Catholicism and Gnosticism, how can you dismiss the Cathars? The Cathars were Dualists, believing that they were pure spirits trapped in an Evil God's world (the Evil god is... - Jehovah - the god who pretends to be human, an angry and vengeful god...) The Cathars believed they were pure souls (parts of the good god, true christian
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
Deep1
Hello Paul, I believe you are missing something. While you are correct in your observation that the Piri Reis Map is from the middle ages (1513 CE to be exact,) the assumption that Piri Reis was actually responsible for charting the map is erroneous. Piri Reis was an Admiral in the Turkish Navy in the Ottoman Turk empire, with a passion for collecting and redrawing maps. He traveled widely, an
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
Deep1
Thanks for your opinions and links, Everyone! I would still like to direct our collective intellectual power to why we assume that Atlantis is to be found in the Atlantic. Is it a psychological trap we fall into because of the similarity in names? Or is it because we want it to be close to home? Will we feel we were a bigger part of it if were next door, instead of far away? Are our emotions
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
Deep1
Thanks for that answer, Dr. Sunil. Just curious - are you in the oceanography or geology field? Your answers use very professional lingo. Deep
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
Deep1
Your assumption is that Plato did not know of the True Ocean. Mine is, he probably did. The Piri Reis Map and the Hapgood map illustrate my point... Does absence of evidence prove evidence of absence?
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
Deep1
I respectfully disagree. Many maps, from the Piri Reis Map to others clearly note the great seas as we know them today. To assume that Plato had seen none of these and knew nothing of the "seas beyond" the ones he called the "true ocean" would be an underestimation of the knowledge of the Greeks. Deep
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
Deep1
Good Website, Dr. Sunil... Just curious, why do think there is so much of an opposition to this theory, when theories with less facts get more mileage? Like the Thera idea, when Plato clearly said that it was not in the Mediterranean? Is it Eurocentrism, a fascination with the Atlantic, or what? Deep
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
Deep1
That is exactly my point... thank you! "The true Ocean" was what? we have always assumed it was the Atlantic, because of the similarity of names. If you look at it upside down, from a point of view of a voyager in 500 BC, past the Indian and the Sundra Straits, the true Ocean would be what call the Pacific today... The Atlantic (today) has always been navigable, thenks to the North an
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
Deep1
I understand the technicalities. My point was, that I cannot find any evidence to suggest that what Plato called the "Atlantic" was what we call the "Atlantic". In fact, anything I can find points to our present Atlantic Ocean was named after the legend, and not before it. Thus, if we accept that the "Pillars of Heracles" are the straits of Gibralter, we are left w
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
Deep1
Hello, Why do we assume that Atlantis is to be found in the Atlantic Ocean? The Atlantic Ocean as we know it today, was named by the Romans for Mount Atlas. This was, thus, well after Plato and his directions. And Plato could not have known of this "renaming". The "true ocean" per Plato, was the Atlantic, which is any ocean outside the Mediterranean. And "beyond the pil
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
Deep1
Hello Claude and Mark, I would have to respectfully disagree with Mark. Catharism was one of the dominant religions in south-central France, and stretched all the way to modern day Bulgaria, cutting a wide swath through modern day Italy and parts of Germany. The Catholic Church murdered hundreds of thousands of them in the inquisition against Gnostics. Talisman the book is quite clear about this
Forum: Mysteries
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