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Results 6511 - 6540 of 6546
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
Egyptologists have for a while noted that the mound obscures the diagonal measurement. They suggest that the pyramid builders had accurate set squares for making the corners 90 degrees.
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
Sorry, Avry, but the chambers-OB correlation is not original to you. I came across it a couple of years ago, though I can't remember where...
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
6513. Petrie
Martin, bravo on the Petrie link.
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
Rosey, I acknowledge you as the originator of this idea!
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
Wlkinson did not say that the Giza pyramids were star symbols, but rather that the pyramids were "stairways to heaven", which is a very old idea. This is different from saying that the star shafts within the GP were stairways to heaven. Moreover, Wilkinson said that the pyramids, and this includes the step pyramids as well, were stairways to the cirumpolar stars, not to Orion's belt, or
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
In other words, the Sphinx looks towards the east, as a herald to the Age of Aquarius.
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
Even if the Egyptians did have a compass (which they didn't), they couldn't have used it to find true north. A compass can only point to magnetic north, which is several degrees off true north. The Giza pyramids are aligned to true north.
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
I agree with you that the Giza pyramids do indeed resemble the stars of Orion's belt. As you may know, I wrote an article on the Forum about Anubis, and how the three pyramids may in fact represent three polar stars. After some consideration, I do not think my suggestion holds as much weight as the OBCT. Robert, I would be happier if you broke your correlation theory into two parts - the OBCT an
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
I should also add that de Lubicz's supposedly original ideas on the different orientations of the temple of Karnak go back to the work of the great British astronomer Sir Norman Lockyer.
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
The earliest reference to a possible 10000BC date for the Sphinx came in 1907 in Gerald Massey's 'Ancient Egypt: Light of the world". I have provided the relative passages from Massey's work at Ian Lawton's site (www.ianlawton.com - under the Hall of Records section). It is possible that Massey's work provided the inspiration for both Cayce and de Lubicz.
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
Does it really matter who endorses the Orion-Giza Correlation or what their qualifications are? Surely it's the quality of their argument that counts.
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
It's pretty fascinating, but breaks down when you say that Oswald killed Kennedy. No one seriously believes the lone gunman theory.
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
This is an ad hominem argument. It is not a valid one.
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
No serious scholar accepts that the shafts point to stars around 10,500 BC. However, many scholars accept that the shafts point to stars around 2450 BC. Also, many scholars accept that the shafts are constructed according to geometric principles. For example, the southern shaft of the King's Chamber points to the culmination point of Orion's Belt ca 2450 BC, yet the angle of this shaft is exactly
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
It could mean that Manetho believed that Cheops' pyramid defied the laws of nature (God).
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
The cardinal direction argument only works for some pyramids. What are we to make of the pyramids of Sekhemkhet and Teti at Saqqara which are offset some 10 degrees from due north?
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
I agree with your post. I never saw Mummy I. Now thanks to your post, I'm not going to see Mummy II either. Just a minor criticism - Imhotep was not deified in his lifetime, but by the Greeks 2,000 years later.
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
Noted.
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
Your idea is correct to a degree. Take Cassiopeia for example. It is five stars in a W shape. The Arabs called this constellation the hand, saying each star represents a fingertip. In this case the human body is the origin of the Arabic image for this constellation. But this idea doesn't work for other constellations. Other explanations have to be sought. I think it is fair to say that, in the M
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
Hi Jameske. I appreciate your observations, though I disagree with them. You are right to say that my theory is tenuous - I only mention Orion, Draco and Taurus. I never mentioned Ursa Minor as the origin of any letter or hieroglyph (at least not yet - though I'm working on it ;-)). All I am saying at this stage is that certain constellations do stand out as suggesting certain patterns. With the
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
6531. Re: John
Hello Robert. I hope your stay in Rome is a pleasant and productive one. Concerning the Benben. I am asking about your assertion that the benben has a stellar significance, which you claim originality on. Are you saying that you think the benben signifies Sirius? What do you have to back up this idea? I follow your argument that because the benben was a meteorite and was made of iron, that it w
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
The Gnostics had seven sacred vowels. There are seven days in a week, named after seven Norse gods. Yes, we know, but there are other explanations besides the seven stars in Orion, e.g., seven days is a 1/4 of a lunar cycle, there are seven bright stars in Ursa Major's tail, there are seven bright stars in Ursa Minor too.
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
How could anyone possibly know that?
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
When your talking about the distance from your fingertip to your elbow, no doubt you're talking about the cubit. However, people's arms are of different lengths, and Egyptologists have looked for a standard means of determining the cubit. It is generally accepted now that the cubit is 1/440 of the side of the GP. Most of the work on the cubit was done by Petrie, and still stands. David Furlong, h
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
Don't forget the tepee.
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
6536. Re: John
The ben-ben has stellar significance. What exactly does this mean? That it signified a particular star? Which star?
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
Read Richard Fields' article on the Forum at this site. He has analysed the Pyramid Texts for the number of mentions given to different astronomical objects and groupings, and concludes that the greatest number of mentions goes to ... Ursa Minor (which is what my Forum article is about).
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
Interesting. It would imply that the priests of Heliopolis (or maybe the priests of Lhasa?) developed the standard mile.
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
John = Ormus. That's an interesting comment. Do you have a reference for this?
Forum: Mysteries
19 years ago
Lee McGiffen
Sadly, most of the comments on this post have centred around name-calling and defence against such. I would like to direct the discussion back to the issues of Sandy's link article itself. I found it interesting that the article mentions mysterious symbols on a seal from Turkmenistan c. 2300 BC. The article says that these symbols are unknown in other parts of the world, but I think not. The sym
Forum: Mysteries
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