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2 months ago
Laird Scranton
The ancient tradition approaches these questions the way that Einstein did - qualitatively. There's a huge advantage to that, over a mathematical approach. The problem is that, working backward from where we are, the math ultimately leads us either to division by zero or to what looks like infinity - neither of which math is able to accommodate. A qualitative approach leads us to a quantum dom
Forum: Mysteries
4 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote: There are several mentions of the Dogon in it besides other cultures. As a quick overview, apparently the Sages could have been aliens, such is their descriptions of having emerged out of water among the cultures identified by the author. They are the initial teachers of mankind when civilized lifestyles begun to spring up. The outloook that the mythical Nummo teachers of the Do
Forum: Mysteries
4 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote: A recent article on the Article's board observes some things...does any of it define where you come from in your observations of your investigations? If you're referring to Don B. Carroll's article on the Light Cubit as the view that use of the cubit derives from human anatomy, my answer is yes and no. My effort is to triangulate on what ancient cultures themselves represent
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote Who taught the teachers? I'll take this one as a rhetorical question. - Laird
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote: We'd have to posit a way to investigate such ancient understandings having an origin point, rather than estimate the Dogon or any such ancient culture was taught certain things, as all that does is move the goal posts forward. No - your perspective is a non-starter. Sincerely entertaining the Dogon perspective means starting with their "givens" - which flatly include a
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
Laird Scranton
I suppose it's a matter of process. I'm open to an approach in which, if a thing's not clear, you ask why the thing is so, or how we know that it's so. Can't be digging sand out from underneath the sandcastle as we try to build it. - Laird
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew - Mark Twain said, “What gets us into trouble is not what we don't know. It's what we know for sure that just ain't so.” In my estimation what' required here is to invest the effort to sincerely entertain the main thrust of the Dogon perspective. What that means is this: It means that we agree to play a kind of game. At the outset, simply ask the question, "What if what the Dog
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote: Quite the many such, really...including ‘universes form in pairs’ and ‘comparative studies imply’ how they function. It’s all inference based upon the flimsiest of examples and how you have thought about several things and edited the crap out of how to present such things. I see in some of your responses throughout this topic that they are practised responses that can literally be
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote: Your post is quite the contradiction of ideas and factual components found in archaeology, and math, and estimations of those combined with the remnants of such left to us to estimate, and make sense of. Wrotely knock it down, rather than entertain it - it is! - Laird
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote: Isn’t the wonder of being sure about meanings is that there are references of such elsewhere that are similar if not the same? You speak often about Dogon and Buddhist commonalities, and the knowledge set down for each are some 4 ½ thousand years apart. Either each came to their own conclusions, or each had the same origins where one line of knowledge went on a very long hiatus bef
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew - I see good reason to think that there were high cultures in prior eras, and that - as my late friend John Anthony West was convinced - that Gobekli Tepe-era instruction may have been carried out by survivors of one or more of those cultures following the end of the last Ice Age. In support of that idea, where the ancient Egyptians speak of a First Time, and Buddhism tells of the firs
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
Laird Scranton
The Dogon descriptions and symbols shortcut one of the core issues of this type of discussion. To the extent that they consistently and correctly represent the descending stages of matter - knowing that each representation is also preserved in one or more other ancient traditions - then we should be hard-pressed to argue that someone in ancient times wasn't in command of a much more detailed unde
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote: ..in a way, it is like comparing the infinitesimal to the infinite where both have definition without knowing what the limits of each are...just that they have identities that are not really comparable. Attacking this piecemeal is really not the way to approach the subject. Parallelism is one of the core principles of the Dogon outlook. Effectively what they describe are a handf
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote: I for one do not grasp how a circle can be portrayed as a straight line and used for geometry as a granary offered, as you say, to be problematic, unless the circle is made a straight line. How does one make flat faces from a curve? One doesn't. It's a theoretical form - a grand symbol of the Dogon cosmology in the same ways that a Buddhist stupa is a grand symbol of its associa
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
Laird Scranton
When faced with a choice of uncertain possibilities, my science teachers taught me to sincerely entertain them, then simply follow where they lead until we bump into a contradiction. Given that the Dogon priests flatly claim that their symbolic system describes how matter forms - and given the correctness of their representation of concepts relating to an atom, that's the approach I've taken: To
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote: You'll have to choose your words better, Laird. "In the Dogon esoteric tradition, it is the initiate's responsibility to continue to ask the next pertinent question. If their informant deems the question to be appropriate to the initiate's status, the priest is required to respond truthfully. If not, the priest is required to remain silent. If pressed, the informant is allo
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote: To initiates who inquire about things to the priests, the priests may give up all manner of misleading responses until the very right question is asked, and then the very right answer has to be given up. No matter how many misleading answers are given up, it is up to the initiate to decide whether an answer is correct or not... In the Dogon esoteric tradition, it is the initiate
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote: if the granary is a theoretical construction using a circle as its foundation, and applied to straight sides, then one must take the circumference of the circle and make it a straight line, no? No. The circular base has a circumference, as any circle does. no matter how something is filled up, the best way to access it is to let gravity do its thing, especially if a little do
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote: It sure is an odd looking granary, and the description of it sure does defy some things: a circular base with four flat, pyramid-like sides that are steep, becoming a flat top. Even the drawing you supply looks a bit Escher-ish...on the one hand it shows a circular base, and on the other hand that base has corners. Just as a Buddhist stupa is not allowed to have a practical functio
Forum: Mysteries
5 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew - Your geometry certainly has some things in common with the Dogon Granary form. A key aspect of the Dogon shrine is that it reconciles a circular base - of 64 cubits in circumference - with a square roof - measuring 64 square cubits. Those matching (self-confirming) measures are one factor that lead us to understand it as an original form. - Laird
Forum: Mysteries
6 months ago
Laird Scranton
Thanks, Drew! I'm also waiting on books I've ordered, so you have my sympathy. - Laird
Forum: Mysteries
6 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote: As much as we can tell, specific plans or instructions for such things may not be exactly as we would hope them to be...all the temples etc were raided long ago and information either destroyed or hidden away, so what we are left with is what we have. In trying to decipher what these things are, folk are lead on a treasure hunt - so to speak - in doing our best to uncover what thin
Forum: Mysteries
6 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew - I don't have a fix on which gnomon figure you intend, so I may need to wait on discussing that. My outlook regarding the ancient material is that it's not proprietary - that it was intended for humanity as a group. - Laird
Forum: Mysteries
6 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew - There are numerous figurines that have been uncovered at the site - if you could link the image of the one you mean, I'll check it out. - Laird
Forum: Mysteries
6 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote: The particular point I’d start with is if you included mention of the little gnomon figurine at Gobekli Tepe in your book on GT. If you mean the stylized H on the Gobekli Tepe pillar that, on closer inspection, I take to depict two elephants, no - I wasn't aware of that at the time I published my book Point of Origin. I do discuss the concept of the embracing Ganeshas in Chapter
Forum: Mysteries
6 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote: I've already addressed everything you wrote in your above post. Actually, I've probably addressed all you could write in your next post. Damn shame you couldn't address the queries I put forward. We may have a different sense of which parts are primarily commentary and which call for response from me. An advantage of moving forward a step at a time is that stitches don't get dro
Forum: Mysteries
6 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote: For AEs, they were intelligent enough that whomever taught the AEs about scientific things would not need metaphor nor analogy in such as an 'eye' for the High Priests to hold onto and record as something substantial in their knowledge. At heart, the information represented symbolically is scientific, and seemingly aimed at a future - necessarily technological - audience. My out
Forum: Mysteries
6 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote: Ancient cultures were surely limited by what they could directly investigate, while we may never know what they could investigate by other means, and yet we have references to such astounding knowledge in their cultures, sciences, beliefs and works. The commonly-shared Dogon and Buddhist outlook is that they learned these things from someone who thoroughly understood them. So th
Forum: Mysteries
7 months ago
Laird Scranton
Drew wrote: Dreams do offer ways of delving into information held within us because dreams release a different perspective on something we already know but just can't put our finger on...our focus is on other things when that little thing hiding in the peripheral is what we need. I've read Jung and Pauli's book on Pauli's desire to access that dream state while awake...or at least tap into it
Forum: Mysteries
7 months ago
Laird Scranton
Cladking wrote: Many of us see these ancient connections by various means but one of the more common is the similarities in myths, words, rituals, or "symbols". We see this because of the way we think without ever realizing that the speakers of the original words didn't think at all like any of us... We see the attempts at preserving ancient knowledge but can't interpret it directly
Forum: Mysteries
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