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Results 4621 - 4650 of 4886
8 years ago
Nolondil
Interesting that the Wikipedia article on Joseph does not mention the known historical Egyptian figure Yuya, though the article on Yuya does mention his possible correlation with Joseph. They even have Yuya's mummy and have conducted genetic testing on it, revealing that he has sub-Saharan ancestry.
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
Nolondil
They probably were somewhat adapted to cold. Not the nose, the human nose is too small to make any difference for inhaled air temperature. The entire body. Neanderthal body shape was "stocky" compared to ours and so had less surface area for the same mass. Experiments have been done showing that there is a difference even among modern humans in how fast body heat is lost, corresponding
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
Nolondil
That's 12,000 years currently estimated! From articles I have read, they think they have only excavated about ten percent of the site so far. There are likely to be deeper layers and those could be much older.
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
Nolondil
Why this elaborate "theory" that the Antikythera device was a copy of the captured devices in Rome? Again, there is no reason that Archimedes had to be the sole possessor of the knowledge needed to make these types of machines. In fact, it seems extremely unlikely that a single individual could have done it. Those gears had to be filed and fitted by hand, remember. It was very time-inte
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
Nolondil
And just who "believed" that it was taken in the siege of Syracuse? I'm not aware of any documented theory to that effect for this device. There are mentions of similar devices in ancient literature. And one of those mentions is indeed of two being acquired in the capture of Syracuse. Both are accounted for, though. The general who captured them kept one for himself and donated the othe
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
Nolondil
No, I don't think the Antikythera device is attributed to Archimedes personally. His life span falls about a century earlier than the estimated date of manufacture for the device. But there is quite a bit of evidence of it having been made in Syracuse, where he lived. Even though it was made of bronze, it could not have lasted for a century without at least some maintenance and probably replaceme
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
Nolondil
"African" lions are one subspecies. There are lions in India, as well. Lions were common within historical times throughout the Levant (remember the Biblical story of Samson and the lion?) and right into southern Europe. The ancient Greeks had to fear lions right in Greece!
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
Nolondil
Space is expanding, remember. Light emitted when the universe was one size will keep traveling while it is expanding. So, when the light reaches us, it shows us things that are now much further away than they were when it started out. Look at for a more detailed explanation.
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
Nolondil
The observable universe is more than 90 billion light years across. And it is clear that we cannot see all of it. Where do you get the figure 8 billion light years for the size of the universe? The age of the universe is about 13.75 billion years, but due to the expansion of space we are observing objects that were originally much closer but are now considerably farther away (as defined in ter
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
Nolondil
Well, I am certainly interested in any details of the archaeological record in this regard. I can only make very general guesses about what to look for without knowing exactly what the evidence is for the development of agriculture in the Americas. The "fully formed" issue about the Olmecs reminds me of Ancient Egypt. :)
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
Nolondil
Well, this question has puzzled me. How would you deduce "who was around" in a given region from the development of a food crop? And why would you need to? What reason would there be to think it was anyone other than the ancestors of the later inhabitants who left identifiable artifacts, the Olmecs, Toltecs, Mayans, etc? I do see the problem with the apparent date of origin and the dif
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
Nolondil
How would they know anything about plants? Just by accumulating experience. Hunter-gatherers must have found the seeds of wheat's immediate ancestors easier to gather and store than other sorts of seeds. They probably used baskets or clay pots that haven't survived. But being able to store some food in a Levantine winter, mild as those would have been, would have been a definite survival advantag
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
Nolondil
This is shaping up like an echo of the Intelligent Design debate. Just like the arguments about evolution in general, you have to ask, why couldn't it have been done the usual way? Just selecting and propagating good food plants. If someone in the distant past were really able to alter individual genes, you'd think they would have removed undesirable characteristics like the binding of niacin i
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
Nolondil
Yes, part of the reason people on the "industrial food" diet eat so much more than they should seems to be craving for other nutrients that are not present in the purified starch and sugar being pushed by corporations as food. But we still need a certain minimum of calories. Chewing fruits and vegetables takes time, even when they are cooked or pre-sliced or whatever. So eating enough c
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
Nolondil
You said you ate more fruits and vegetables than starchy foods. And I wondered if that meant servings or calories, though perhaps I didn't make that clear enough. >What about fruits and vegetables? I eat more of those than the staples >you listed above. If it is servings, that's not such a big deal. It's easy to eat snacks of fruit or have a salad for lunch. If it really is calories, tha
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
Nolondil
More total calories? If that is true, you are very unusual. Most people in the "advanced" countries live on the staple calorie dense foods he is talking about. (Even those who eat a relatively "healthy" diet. A significant fraction live on very bland white bread and pasta products, and their main vegetable intake is potatoes in the form of french fries!) Being able to consume
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
Nolondil
This is even more true than was realized. They are now discovering that some genetic material from our food can leak into our blood and affect how our own genes function. ScienceDaily (Sep. 19, 2011) — In a new study, Chen-Yu Zhang's group at Nanjing University present a rather striking finding: that plant miRNAs could make into the host blood and tissues via the route of food intake. Moreover
Forum: Mysteries
9 years ago
Nolondil
There are far more than two possibilities. There are nearly infinite shades of possibilities for a true story being distorted by retelling over thousands of years.
Forum: Mysteries
9 years ago
Nolondil
Hey, all you need to "discover" bread is grain, stones to grind it, water, and fire. Since we know that humans have been cooking their food for about two million years, it's not exactly shocking that bread could be older than we had thought. I've even had a "theory" for years about how the principle of bread-making could have been discovered by very primitive humans. It would
Forum: Mysteries
10 years ago
Nolondil
Well, if we assume that Mars would have originally been orbiting in a nearly perfect orbit like Earth, then it does show signs of being perturbed. Both the inclination and eccentricity of its orbit are much larger than Earth. ....................................... Mars ......... Earth ......... Ratio Orbit inclination (deg) ....... 1.850 ........ 0.000 ........ - Orbit eccentricity
Forum: Mysteries
10 years ago
Nolondil
Yes, the Earth had a significantly higher levels of oxygen in its atmosphere at certain times in the past. This would explain why insects were much larger in the distant past. They don't have efficient circulatory systems and depend on diffusion more more than vertebrate animals. And it might also help to explain how large dinosaurs got enough oxygen into their bulky bodies. A higher rate of meta
Forum: Mysteries
10 years ago
Nolondil
Logically? What's logical about that connection? What does the size of camels have to do with humans? Is there some evolutionary link that requires humans to scale with camels? And 36 feet is dramatically more than twice the size of normal humans. Show me evidence of camels 6 times taller than current camels. An engineer could probably calculate the maximum height a human skeleton could reach b
Forum: Mysteries
10 years ago
Nolondil
Naturally there are social consequences from being much taller than average. Presumably this would not be a problem in a society of people all in the same height range. What makes the stories about giants over 12 feet tall very difficult to believe is the physical consequences of increasing height. Animal bodies are physical structures like any other. They function according to physical laws an
Forum: Mysteries
10 years ago
Nolondil
I read another story somewhere about a lady who was seen to go into a church never came out and couldn't be found anywhere and then later somebody found a historical account of a certain well known man getting married to a lady of the same name who told him she came from the very town that the lady had disappeared from, only the account was from several centuries in the past. --- That sounds ve
Forum: Mysteries
10 years ago
Nolondil
This is classic urban legend talk. It might be an unrecognized type of mineral, but that doesn't make it magical. Nothing is "impossible to cut". The hardest substances, natural or artificial, can be cut with abrasion tools of various types. You just need to supply 'grit' (such as diamond dust) and change your blades/drill bits frequently.
Forum: Mysteries
10 years ago
Nolondil
This article is also incomplete. He should have researched a bit further. Medieval Egyptian historians left a clear record of what happened to the nose of the Great Sphinx. European visitors to Egypt prior to Napoleon's expedition had already discovered the vandalism to the Sphinx. In 1546, for example, when Dr. Pierre Belon explored Egypt, he visited "the great colossus." "The
Forum: Mysteries
10 years ago
Nolondil
Hey, that is really cool. I didn't even know that existed. Now it is going into my bookmark collection. ;)
Forum: Mysteries
10 years ago
Nolondil
I agree. A podcast would be much better than video on Youtube. Who cares what they were wearing that day or what books are on the shelves behind them? A simple MP3 is much easier to handle. Is uses far less computer power and in fact you don't even need a computer to listen to it. You can copy it onto an MP3 player, which many people own these days.
Forum: Mysteries
10 years ago
Nolondil
David Rohl would say yes to that question. The Jerusalem Report (February 1, 1999) broke the story in the article – “Paradise Found.” Ten miles from the sprawling Iranian industrial city of Tabriz, to the northwest of Teheran, says British archaeologist David Rohl, he has found the site of the Biblical garden . . . "As you descend a narrow mountain path, you see a beautiful alpine val
Forum: Mysteries
10 years ago
Nolondil
> Hey, David, you've been reading too much sci-fi ....... Greg Bear indeed :-D I was wondering if he was serious about the Scifi author being involved in ARE projects... :)
Forum: Mysteries
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