Mysteries :  The Official GrahamHancock.com forums
For serious discussion of the controversies, approaches and enigmas surrounding the origins and development of the human species and of human civilization. (NB: for more ‘out there’ posts we point you in the direction of the ‘Paranormal & Supernatural’ Message Board). 
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23 days ago
MDaines
Lee McGiffen writes Oh, London Real TV, the David Icke channel. Gimme a break. Plandemic Indoctornation:
Forum: Gunpowder, Treason & Plot
23 days ago
MDaines
24 days ago
MDaines
In my quest for the truth about Sumero-Egyptian Osiris, I have been looking once again into mentions of the great Mesopotamian fish-god and the various related translated names. Jason Colavito’s blog is impressive on that score and I take the liberty of copying a relatively short excerpt from his page concerning Oannes of Berosus fame. I have said somewhere hereabouts that Jason is a highly inter
Forum: Mysteries
4 weeks ago
MDaines
Fear ends where truth begins.
Forum: Gunpowder, Treason & Plot
4 weeks ago
MDaines
Censored on Youtube.
Forum: Gunpowder, Treason & Plot
6 weeks ago
MDaines
There are many Sumerian proverbs dating to the Old Babylonian period ca.1900-1600 BC. They go unnoticed by the general public but have been very useful in my investigation into the truth about those ancient texts and symbols. Some, if not all, can be understood as much older, possibly by as much as a thousand years. The proof of this lies in several lines from the text of The Story of Sukurru, ca
Forum: Mysteries
6 weeks ago
MDaines
Hello Dune, Thanks for the links. Both very interesting but particularly The Horn in Antiquity - for me anyway. I've written quite a bit about the significance of the bull/auroch and horns in Sumerian texts (in Before Babel), but the subject is vast and there is always something new to be gleaned. One example is EL, source of the later god, which is made up of two symbols, SAL, the feminine,
Forum: Mysteries
6 weeks ago
MDaines
Hello Dune, Sumerian MU, ‘age’, ‘name’, ‘fame’ and, according to me, syllable of all ‘movement’, is given multiple times in the lexical lists with UN (7 pages on ePSD): MU-UN, the age of the people, the fame of the land. Also given numerous times with NA, ‘heavy’ and ‘stone’ as MU-NA. Strangely, no-one else finds any reason to suggest that these symbols are the origin of ‘moon’, and also of anci
Forum: Mysteries
7 weeks ago
MDaines
Lobsang writes We are both using two different approaches. Hence, different results. That doesn't strike me as being the case. As far as I can tell, you haven't been researching the ultimate source of the names of the deities you were mentioning. I simply came along to offer up that source and the meanings for the purpose of adding some useful information to your research. Thank you for t
Forum: Mysteries
7 weeks ago
MDaines
Lobsang writes I doubt if IN-DARA is the root of Indra. I already found Indra's Sumerian counterpart, and he does not go by the name IN-DARA. That is a surprising pronouncement from my perspective, Lobsang. I gave the root of a name that is pronounced In-dra as coming from collocated symbols that are clearly important as a pair in Sumerian literary texts and pronounced IN-DARA. I honestly can'
Forum: Mysteries
7 weeks ago
MDaines
Lobsang writes I have never heard of a Sumerian deity named IN-DARA. It’s certainly not listed in any deity list. Hello again, I'm afraid you misunderstand what I wrote. I am not saying that there ever was a Sumerian deity named IN-DARA. I am saying that the Hindu deity very probably got her name from this language known to us today as Sumerian, and that it is possible to gain more understan
Forum: Mysteries
7 weeks ago
MDaines
Lobsang writes Thanks for your post. How did you come up with IN-DAR-A? Was it derived from the Hindu god Indra? What do you make of this deity called “Kakka”? Hi Lobsang, My contention is that Hindu Indra comes from Sumerian IN-DARA and that such names can - at least sometimes - be usefully analysed through the monosyllabic method to gain insight into their origin. Kakka doesn’t direc
Forum: Mysteries
7 weeks ago
MDaines
IN-DARA : ‘the straw to pierce’ Given together numerous times in the Sumerian lexical tablets, also as IN-DAR-A and IN-DAR-RA where IN has the usual meaning of ‘straw’ and relates to the damage done to crops by rodents. It was most probably understood as the ‘straw’ of the Milky Way, the cosmic vulva. Our word ‘in’ comes from the bringing in of the crops, the harvesting and is the phoneti
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Andy writes Very interesting, Madeleine. I do not have a reference handy but I do remember that the Sumerians also described Dilmun as their source for copper. Regarding your reference to "precious oils" I wonder if this pertains to a source of bitumen which they required to seal their reed boats. Hi Andy, No, bitumen wouldn’t rate as a precious oil. As you say, it was black tar
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
15. Dilmun
Andy writes there was an ancient civilization on the Arab peninsula that ancient Sumerians regarded highly. However, much of their archaeological record appears to have disappeared. This makes it a great mystery. The Wikipedia entry for Dilmun is interesting but incomplete. Line 265 of The Story of Sukurru (aka The Instructions of Shuruppak) contains the oldest Sumerian literary mention
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Hello Fahadtn, I visited the exhibition dedicated to Al Ula at the Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris last October. There is clearly a push to encourage tourism. It was mesmerising. There were several videos, including the one presented here by Hanslune, and to get a feel for the ambiance of such a different world was a real pleasure. How old are those places really? How old is Petra in Jordan
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Hello Brendan, To put some real Sumerian perspective into the names of at least two of these many gods: Ashar apparently stems from AN-ŠAR₂ which would be pronounced ANSHAR. AN is the sky, air, lightness while ŠAR₂ is a big black hole with the meanings ‘totality’ and ‘world’ and ‘slaughter’. It is also given as meaning ‘3600’ which might interest you. In The Story of Sukurru, currently t
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Engbren writes While this example is from the Middle Kingdom of Egypt, I found this line in the Hymn to Osiris from the Stela of Sobk-Iry and thought it curious: "Whom thousands bless (15) in Kher-aha,5" Kher-aha is Babylon. Reference: Mariam Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature, pp202-204, Hello Engbren, I’m following your posts on the possible Saturn link at Giza and fi
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Hello again Avry, First of all, thank you for being a breath of fresh air. Whether you agree with me or not, the tone is appreciated. I don’t associate knowledge of Egyptian hieroglyphs and/or linguistics in general with that of Sumerian but didn’t mean to be offensive in suggesting you might not have studied the language. Very few people have. I will go directly to your three points, bearing i
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Warwick, As I remember it, you came to this OP entirely for the sad pleasure of baiting Cladking. Nothing more. Presumably you had nothing of any interest to add to the OP. And nothing better to do. You have no reason to post on this thread apart from the equally dubious pleasure of taking out of context a message that is meant for another person, in response to his - which I presume you have rea
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Mike writes I suggested that final "R" could well be Ra, the sun in Egypt, but is Shamash in Sumerian. So? And sound "Sa" was still missing its counterpart. My suggestion is "Sah", Orion for Egyptians. In Egypt, Wsir or Ausar could make sense for Osiris many aspects if coming from "A-Hu-Sah-Ra", a series of concepts connected to life and death, rebirth and
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
To know ME forget your name. (ETCSL, Sumerian Proverbs from Nibru, Collection 6.2.1) Al-Khidr, prophet and patron saint of Ibn Arabi (17th century watercolour). One facet of this profoundly important language. For those who have ears. Madeleine
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Atugablish writes What is important to understand here is, the signs written before the first "=" indicate the pronunciation, written syllabically, of the "U" sign. These intial signs were not intended to be read as individual words, but rather in combination to replicate the "sound" of a Sumerian word. With all due respect to your position and learning within
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Ok, Manu. As I understand it, he is definitely in the category Assyriologist rather than Sumerologist. Given the long history of the language, it's preferable to make the distinction. Madeleine
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Manu, Please understand that a single Sumerian tablet with a few early symbols on it will not serve any useful purpose. I didn't realise that you considered yourself to be blind on this matter. I also thought that my responses to previous posts had served at the very least to explain the difference between a monosyllabic approach, one symbol equalling one word with inherent value, and the academ
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
MDaines Wrote: ------------------------------------------------------- > Sorry, Manu, I don't play games of this sort for > anyone. If I remember rightly, you've already > attempted to play me off against another blogger > in the past and on another subject; it concerned > Sirius and the sun. When did you start taking > yourself for the Master of Ceremonies here? If you
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Sorry, Manu, I don't play games of this sort for anyone. If I remember rightly, you've already attempted to play me off against another blogger in the past and on another subject; it concerned Sirius and the sun. When did you start taking yourself for the Master of Ceremonies here? If you want to compare my translations to the Assyrian versions, i invite you to inspect the proverbs presented on m
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Hello Avry, Thank you for taking the time to put your views forward with consideration and, no doubt, sincerity. I have read it all and, of course, have to disagree on your basic premise which is that Sumerian was an isolated language. I take it that you have not studied my translations and perhaps even that you have not studied Sumerian in any depth. I don't have the time to engage in a long di
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Atugablish writes The meaning "laughter" is quite rare, and likely derived from the ecstatic nature of laughing so hard that it produced tears. I quote you here as testimony to the shallow nature of your thoughts on the early Sumerian. Laughable indeed. But my tears are for the scribes. Madeleine
Forum: Mysteries
2 months ago
MDaines
Warwick writes " The Truth about Sumero-Egyptian Osiris is in the Tablets" apparently the panel at large is expected to discuss the above in a vacuum. How society is molded by it's beliefs and how those beliefs can be seen to permeate a given culture ( one of the denominators of which is language and it's written form) is far from a hobby. Frankly I fail to understand why Madel
Forum: Mysteries
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