Author of the Month :  The Official GrahamHancock.com forums
Join us at this forum every month for a discussion with famous popular authors from around the world. 
Welcome! Log InRegister
Go to: Forum HomeBoardNew Topic

Pages: 12Next
Current Page: 1 of 2
Results 1 - 30 of 35
5 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
I'm not very optimistic myself, yet I think it is important to investigate the reason for this situation. I am preparing a new post in the "Further Thoughts and Ramifications"- series, which I will upload on the Mysteries forum in the course of next week, in which I will try to consider the problem from a cultural philosophical perspective.
Forum: Author of the Month
5 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
The first subject for discussion under this heading was posted earlier this month here on the AOM message board. I will post nr. 2 and 3 in this series next month on the Mysteries forum.
Forum: Author of the Month
5 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
Yes Eddie, I think you certainly found one of the reasons. I did not mean my question to be loaded, but open. It seems to me that it is crucial to find the answers as a first step in bridging the divide on this point between academic and independent researchers. Would you agree?
Forum: Author of the Month
5 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
An interesting thought and an interesting link, thank you! One questions, though, would still remain to be answered: Why are most if not all mainstream prehistorians so reluctant to consider and investigate evidence of a vigorous ancient civilisation long before the Bronze Age empires arose?
Forum: Author of the Month
5 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
Your questions are very much to the point. The investigation of other stars as possible targets of the temple orientations has been conducted by archaeo-astronomers before me and I discuss their work in Part Two, Ch. One of my book, to which I refer the reader who is sincerely interested. This is not intended as an advertisement for my book, but I simply cannot reproduce an entire chapter here.
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
Thank you so much, Ray. The period is five thousand years, from around 9,150 to 4,250 BC. The value of my discovery lies in the fact that it gives an answer to important questions surrounding the Maltese temples, which had never been solved satisfactorily: Why have so many temples been built? Why the two clusters of orientations on both sides of due south, while no two of then were exactly the
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
.... as well as spewing it..., cheers to you too.
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
At a higher altitude of a few degrees, like this nice example of the Ta Hagrat temple looking towards the Victoria Lines, no or hardly any atmospheric extinction needs to be factored in for a very bright star like Sirius to be clearly visible at this altitude here. The arcus visionis for Sirius is generally taken to be 7 or 8 degrees.
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
It is indeed amazing to meet people on this platform who churn out posts (this was your 2,051-st) and call authors dogmatic without actually having read their work and without apparently being at home in the subject they comment on. You reproduced my photograph of the Ta Hagrat temple, which overlooks the Victoria lines. Contrary to what you surmise, this raised horizon of several degrees will re
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
Hi PB, if you're referring to the first quotation of Tbird's long list of quotes, you'll find it in the comments under my AOM article ( March 2019).
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
@ Thunderbird. Your first quote (from Freddy Silva) left out my response to his misunderstanding of the annual visibility and invisibility periods of all the stars except the circumpolar ones. Here it is: "Dear Freddy Silva, I explained the reason why you saw Sirius with your computer sky programme during daylight: You looked at the wrong time of year. Just look at Sirius during any winter m
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
My book gives a name to the discovery, more than thirty years ago, by George Agius & Frank Ventura that there is a principle behind the highly non random distribution of azimuths of the Maltese temples. The name of this principle is precession.
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
Dear Steve, Thank you very much for your interesting post. You ask about a Table of Contents, and you will find it on my website www.sirius-malta.com, together with a lot of other information, including a video in which many of the details of the book are set out. Before answering the specific questions you ask, I would like to address some points you make in your introduction. The passages
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
Thank you Poster Boy, you saw it. Thank you for having given me the opportunity to clarify important points.
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
Correct, PB. The map shows all the temple sites recorded by John D. Evans in his survey published in 1971. Many of these sites have been lost. The diagram by Agius and Ventura incorporates all the temples, 18 in all, the regular ground plan of which has been preserved.
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
For the answers to all of these questions I would like to refer you to the book.
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
The temples with azimuths closest to due south (see the diagram by Agius & Ventura reproduced in my AOM article) were the earliest to be built, following the precession curves for the rising and setting positions of Sirius. Thus, the very small temple of Hagar Qim North, with an azimuth of 186, was the earliest, directed to the setting point of the star in around 9,150 BC, closely followed by
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
I don't quite understand your problem, dear Barbelo. A simple Google search may answer your question perfectly. Should you wish to see my book without ordering it, I deposited a copy in the Gozo public record library, where it may be consulted for free.
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
The rate of precession is indeed a given. It was first calculated by the Greek astronomer Hipparchus more than 2000 years ago. His outcome was later corrected and we now know that its rate is ca. 1 cm in 70 years. Why the precession of Sirius is the solution for the orientation of the Maltese temples is unfolded in my AOM article in concise form. The book is there for those who are interested in
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
The rate of precession is a given. If the azimuth of a temple is known, calculating the date of the construction of the temple follows from the precession curve of the star. See the fold-out graph drawn up by Prof. Peter Barthel at the back of my Sirius book.
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
Only if a building is directed to an object which moves along the horizon in the course of a year it is relevant to add the time or dsy of the year, for instance the equinoxes or the solstices. The rising and setting points on the horizon of the fixed stars in the night sky, however, show no visible shift in the course of the year. For this reason it is irrelevant to add a date in the year for th
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
I nowhere maintain that the ancient Maltese temple builders had knowledge of precession. However, by directing all the temples except Mnajdra South not to the sun, but to a star in the night sky, they could not have failed to notice that after a certain time this star had moved in an easterly direction, out of the line of sight of a given temple. At that point they built a new temple with a sligh
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
Mnajdra South is orientated to the rising sun at the equinoxes, while during sunrise of the summer and winter solstice the sun rays light up the rim of upright stones respectively to the left and the right of the passage inside the building. Mnajdra South is a sun temple, the only one discovered in Malta. This was first published by Paul Micallef in 1980; Graham Hancock made it known to the rest
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
I advise you, Poster Boy, to read my AOM article for this month (March 2019) closely. And if this does not take away your worries, I refer you to Chapter One of Part Two of the book Sirius, the Star of the Maltese Temples, on which it is based.
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
The slow movement of the stars in the night sky called precession is said to have been discovered by the Greek astronomer Hipparchus in 128 BC. But what do we mean by ‘discovered’? Hipparchus calculated the rate of precession from the observations of the Babylonians, who had minutely recorded the shift of the stars thousands of years before his time (‘back in time up to 2,048 BC’ – Magli1). Thus
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
Cordial thanks, Graham, for the honour to be the Author of the Month on your website for two consecutive months. With all my gratitude, Lenie
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
Thank you so much for this link to my article, PB. I wil use it. You may expect my posts on archaeo-astro topics shortly, Lenie
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
Thank you so much Poster Boy. I suppose the first words of your comment ('This is ideal') refer to the fact that my position of AOM has been prolonged to March? Indeed this is most ideal. There is so much to say and discuss about Malta's great megalithic legacy. You will have noticed that my above topic carries the number (1). I intend this to be a series, and in the coming days and weeks you may
Forum: Author of the Month
6 months ago
Lenie Reedijk
Normally this is so, but my AOM position has been prolonged to March.
Forum: Author of the Month
Pages: 12Next
Current Page: 1 of 2