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2 years ago
Titus Livius
Hello Gary First of all, congratulations for your work during all those years, in particular the research on the Hopis. I have read this remarkable list of heresies, but you don't have mentioned the controversial site of Hueyatlaco (Valsequillo, Mexico), which was dated by several "hard" methods (uranium series, tephrochronology, diatoms, etc.) and the result was about 250,000 BP.
Forum: Author of the Month
2 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi Origyptian I just recommend to visit his personal website: There is a lot of information about his work, and in particular about his book and two controversial sites: Calico (California) and Valsequillo (Mexico). Best regards, TL
Forum: Mysteries
2 years ago
Titus Livius
Hello All Sad news for the alternative archaeology. Today I have received an e-mail from the Pleistocene Coalition that confirms the sudden recent passing of Chris Hardaker, a professional archaeologist, author of the landmark book "The first Americans". He was (I quote the message) "a Pleistocene Coalition founding member and staunch defender of archaeological truth against ma
Forum: Mysteries
3 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi Troglodyte Thanks for this information. Obviously either my source or yours must be wrong, as there is no coincidence. Since you mention a scientific study on physical remains I assume that your version is probably the true one. This could be a case in which legends and accounts do not fit the archaeological research (provided that this research has been carried out properly). Best, TL
Forum: Mysteries
3 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi Merrell I had learnt this information from several web pages and books, but I can't remember all the original sources. However, in two cases I've been able to trace specific sources, for Charlemagne and emperor Maximilian (both about 8 feet tall): Charles DeLoach, "Giants Who Became Gods", in Giants: A Reference Guide from History, the Bible, and Recorded Legend (Metuchen, NJ:
Forum: Mysteries
3 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi Troglodyte Of course, I have noticed the single quote marks and I've assumed that it wasn't your personal view. Nevertheless, most of the current scientific publications -in my humble opinion- don't deserve much attention (or respect) with this kind of claims. Your comment is completely adequate: people affected of gigantism is normaly between 7 and 8 feet. I was already aware of Wadlow's c
Forum: Mysteries
3 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi Merrell Well, some of the egyptian pharaos, (for example Rameses II) and western rulers, as Roman emperor Maximinus (3rd century), emperor Carlomagnus (8th century) or emperor Maximilian (15th century). But in particular in America, you have the Inca rulers, the maya rulers (King Pakal for instance) or the north american native Indian chiefs, as mentioned by the Spanish explorers in the 16t
Forum: Mysteries
3 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi Dr. Troglodyte Excuse me, is this a joke? How can you say that a 1,87 cm. tall man is a giant? The average height of Cro-Magnons was superior, not to mention the real cases of giants in history (from accounts and archeological findings), individuals of huge height (2,50 - 3 metres or more). I think gigantism (as a disease, a hormonal disorder) is not refered to people below 2 metres. Anyway
Forum: Mysteries
3 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi Aine Yes, he is. In fact there are very few good documentaries about giants (I mean, not biased or speculative). Regretfully, this subject has become a show (in the Internet in particular), so it is dificcult to keep a real scientific approach. Dahl is possibly an amateur, but he has gathered a lot of information, and Vieira has made a serious study on the Mound Builders culture, some stone
Forum: Mysteries
3 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi Origyptian, thanks for your observations Oh, yes, the magical word, evidence... For example, where's the irrefutable evidence which confirms that Khufu was buried in "his" pyramid? But... everyone knows that pyramids were built as tombs for the pharaos... no doubt about it. Well, I'm not going to re-open that old controversial debate. Regarding the evidence you demand, since 20
Forum: Mysteries
3 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi T-bird Yes, I know all the references you mention, and those "special" features. Anyway, there are several hypotheses about the origin of these humanoids. I am open to all possibilities, but I think that many people has connected too easily this issue with ETs, demons or esoteric traditions, and this approach has prevented the intervention of open-minded scientific investigator
Forum: Mysteries
3 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi Warren I also read that piece of news and it's obviously ludicrous: these are not giants, but very tall people (under 2 metres). Even the well known Cro-Magnons were taller (in average height) than modern humans. Anyway, in recent times, you can read some reports about supposed giants, but in the end they are exaggerations, manipulations or frauds (in particular in youtube). Meanwhile the r
Forum: Mysteries
3 years ago
Titus Livius
Hello Matthew Well, we are facing this question from different points of view. Yo are focusing on body and mind, and the material marvels of the modern world and my article was focused on (the lack of) spirit in this thing we call "civilization". Do you think that people is happier with more technological communication, more (brain-washing) education and more modern (and aggressive)
Forum: Mysteries
3 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi Steve Well, if I'm not mistaken, the greatest pyramid of all is not in Egypt, but in Mexico. It's the pyramid of Cholula, which has been partially excavated so far. It was about three times bigger than Khufu's pyramid (in volume); and it has a catholic church in its top built by the conquistadors! Best regards, TL
Forum: Mysteries
4 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi Warren Thanks for posting this interesting video. I've watched the whole documentary and I'm really surpised because I am a Spaniard (and with a degree in Archaeology) and I didn't know anything about this. I suppose that my teachers were not aware of these sites either... or they simply ignored them because they were considered "natural formations". Anyway, it is strange that the
Forum: Mysteries
4 years ago
Titus Livius
Hello all Well, if I am not mistaken the so-called "pyramid" was shown for the first time in a famous Spanish TV programme about all kind of mysteries. I watched it and I was not much impressed. It seems that there is indeed a human intervention in that conical hill, but it is very risky to state that it is a pyramid. An open-minded professional archeologist -whom I know personaly- p
Forum: Mysteries
4 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi Ray Thanks for your kind words. Yes, you are right, some of the best contributors to the forums do not post anymore. I miss certain "good old times", as in recent years the topics and discussions are basically the same, with very extreme positions, little dialogue and personals attacks, so for many old posters there isn't much sense in participating here. I think it is a trend whi
Forum: Misc.
4 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi Thanos Well, I contacted Scott a few months ago (due my interest in his work about Vyse's supposed forgery) and he told me that he was not participating anymore in GHMB because he was tired of the same controversies, opinions and -regretfully- personal attacks. Then he decided neither to follow these discussions nor to post new issues. That's the same reason why I do not post here; I was qu
Forum: Misc.
5 years ago
Titus Livius
Hello Aneth If I am not mistaken, Alexander, after conquering the Persian Empire, had conceived plans to conquer the western Mediterranean zone (including Italy), but he died in Babylon before he could face this enterprise. From my humble knowledge of Roman history, the republican Rome was not a great power in those days (we are talking about late 4th century BC). It was still fighting in Ital
Forum: History
6 years ago
Titus Livius
Hello Ocaptain Just a few comments on your statements: 1) First of all, of course, it is easier to claim that history must be re-rewritten than proving it. But in most cases, the alternative authors just say that conventional history has too may flaws, althoug it does not mean that they have the true version of history. 2) History is a science. yes it is, but a social science, not a empirical
Forum: History
8 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi Malankhkare Just a comment about this topic, from a recent investigation conducted by some Catalonian heterodox historians (Institut Nova Història). This is their web: They say Cervantes was a false identity, as the original person was called Miquel de Servent, a typical Catalonian name. They also state that the original "Don Quixote" was written in Catalan, as the castillian ver
Forum: History
8 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi Andy Excellent post. These arguments remind me of a very smart quote by the french poet Paul Valery: "War is a massacre of many people who don't know each other for the profit of a few people who know each other well but don't massacre each other". In fact, history of mankind is the history of wars and conflict, at least in the "civilization" age (since 4000 BC), although
Forum: History
8 years ago
Titus Livius
Hello Ian Thanks for your post. Well, I commented that case because it was very famous and controversial during those times (and even today). Some historians consider that it was the first experiment of massive destruction by air bombing, and there was no real intention of avoiding collateral damage, although there were well identified military targets. However, after all these years, there i
Forum: History
8 years ago
Titus Livius
Hello ianbond Thank you very much for your input. You are right in your comments. In the early years, the British Command realized that the night bombings were not accurate at all and a lot of bombs were needed to cause little damage on targets. However, as the war progressed, the pathfinders and the electronic devices allowed a high level of accuracy. So there was no excuse for "collateral
Forum: History
8 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi T-bird Yes, the same old story for years and years (centuries indeed...) I already knew this Goering's statement. He could be a criminal, but his thinking on this issue is true. People are very naive when accepting the rulers' decissions as they were some kind of gods. They are forced to make a choice (always a bad one) which leads to conflict. Then you have no problem to going to war and ki
Forum: History
8 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi Andy Yes, I couldn't agree more. In the same book I mentioned, the author explains very well all the doctrines, lies, manipulation and censorship that have justified and covered the use of bombings, in particular against civilians, and this could apply to the recent "collateral damages". The case of the atomic bombings at the end of WWII is a perfect example of this criminal behav
Forum: History
8 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi all, These days I’m reading “History of bombings”, an interesting book by the Swedish author Sven Lindqvist. It is a remarkable work about the reason and impact of bombings in the XXth century wars, a terrible scourge in a (supposed) civilized age. I would like to share with you a brief story which happened in Britain in 1948, after WWII, which shows the huge power of propaganda even in the m
Forum: History
9 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi Pete You are right. In a short period of my life I worked as a topographer. In that time, just before the Olympic games at Barcelona (1992), I was performing topographic tasks with a friend of mine (also with archeological degree) for the new international journalists' residence. During the works, we found clear archaeological evidence of a great roman village, but our director told us to for
Forum: History
9 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi again T-bird, I agree with your comments. There is a book which is specifically focused on why allies won the war (including political, ideological, economical and technical reasons). I read it some time ago, but I can't remember the author's name. Following the author's conclusions, Germany had an opportunity to win the war in 1940 or 1941, but after the defeat at Moscow and the US intervent
Forum: History
9 years ago
Titus Livius
Hi T-bird thanks for your extended response. You really are a scholar in those subjects! Well, following your arguments, it seems that history repeats the same patterns throughout the times. When mentioning the great losses of the Northern armies, I recalled the great losses that the soviets suffered between 1943 and 1945 against the Wehrmacht in retreat. Quality against quantity; you can win
Forum: History
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