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14 years ago
Briffits
Hi Gordon, Gordon Strachan wrote: > we are all built > to the same proportion: that is, the Fibonacci ratios. For > example, if the length from the tummy button to the feet is 8 > units, then the tummy button to the top of the head would be 5 > units. If the forearm is taken as 8 units, the whole hand will > be 5 units and the joints of the fingers will be in the ratio > of
Forum: Author of the Month
14 years ago
Briffits
Hi Gordon, Yes, I think you're right about the tunings. I hadn't considered it in the context of the architectural differences but it makes sense. In the Gothic period 3rds and 6ths were dissonances, but became consonants in the Renaissance. Tertiary harmony began to take on such importance that they would even compress 2nds and narrow some 5ths a few cents in order to make the 3rds purer. It
Forum: Author of the Month
14 years ago
Briffits
Hi Claude, I wasn't necessarily speaking to the claim he makes of the power of those particular pitches, only that tunings and scales are quite subjective and none can really said to be the ideal. Certainly it's well known that amplified subharmonic frequencies, i.e. below the range of human hearing, in the neighborhood of 8hz have the ability to make people sick and even kill. So it's not tha
Forum: Author of the Month
14 years ago
Briffits
Claude, et al, Your link is interesting, however I must say that all scales and tunings are to some extent arbitrary and any claim of a particular one being "ideal" is questionable. A 440 is a modern tuning standard and doesn't even exist in the scale given on that page. As to the Pythagorean comma, it was dealt with at various times prior to tempered tuning in different ways. In earl
Forum: Author of the Month
14 years ago
Briffits
Kboldt wrote: > And that quote from the Treaty of Tripoli was never really in > the treaty. > > From the National Archives footnote on the Treaty of > Tripoli.... > > "The Barlow translation of the Treaty of Tripoli is at best a > poor attempt at a paraphrase or summary of the sense of the > Arabic . . . . Most extraordinary (and wholly unexplained) is > th
Forum: Author of the Month
15 years ago
Briffits
Hi John, My condolences on your loss. The bond that exists with our animal friends is difficult to explain to those that haven't experienced it. I know I only need project into the future when my 12 year old cat Calliope dies to have a wave of grief pass over me and she's still remarkably healthy and spry. In the Catholic school of my youth St. Blaize Day was when the priest would place crosse
Forum: Author of the Month
15 years ago
Briffits
Hi Rob, That's an interesting idea. In the film the character's intent isn't malignant, though. He's the one that's treated badly. The film btw is Argentinian, directed by Eliseo Subiela and came out in the mid to late 80's. I've been hearing rumors that it was in line to be reissued on dvd. It can be found on vhs at some video rental shops here. It was one of those offbeat films of that period
Forum: Author of the Month
15 years ago
Briffits
I wonder if perhaps, Laotian would be a living example of Blair's theory. In written form it's based on Pali script but the oral language is much older. I don't know its history, but it's a pitched language with consonants divided between middle, high and low sounds based on the local pentatonic scale. Mostly monosyllabic, a simple word can have several completely different meanings depending on
Forum: Author of the Month
15 years ago
Briffits
I've heard that about Parkinson's patients response to music. It reminds me a bit of Man Facing Southeast, do you know that film? In it a man committed to an asylum spends a great deal of time standing out on the grounds claiming he's picking up radio signals from a certain star. As the film unfolds it seems implied that the man is a kind of Christ, at one point he shows his doctor a photograph o
Forum: Author of the Month
15 years ago
Briffits
Brew99's mention of Tuva put me in mind of a story my closest friend of the past two decades experienced. I don't think he'd mind me relating it. There's a singer he's a big fan of, Yungchen Lhamo, a young Tibetan woman, born in a labor camp, who walked out of Tibet and was working with children in a refugee camp in India when the Dalai Lama, no less, told her to take her musical talents out into
Forum: Author of the Month
15 years ago
Briffits
There are a couple Tuvan ensembles that tour in the west that both feature throat singing, Huun-Huur-Tu which I've seen and Yat Kha, which I haven't. In addition extraordinary singers like the Tuvan born Sainkho Namtchylak can often be found performing in avant garde and improvisatory circles in the west. The English musicians Tim Hodgkinson and Ken Hyder have done several trips to Siberia and re
Forum: Author of the Month
15 years ago
Briffits
Paul Cochrane wrote: > > There is a write up > about how the Beatles music was the single largest factor to > bring democracy to Russia, by thier own admission! They > seemed like simple little songs, but they communicated in a > big way to Russia. I also discovered a number of > synchronicities between the Beatles music and Russia. Maybe > you or others on this site will
Forum: Author of the Month
15 years ago
Briffits
Sherman Peabody wrote: > > One time, decades ago, I had a VERY bad dream. Woke up, > turned on the radio to try to help get the dream out of my > head, and the first thing I hear as I turn on the radio is > Pink Floyd (from the "Animals" album - song "Dogs") singing > "no, this is no bad dream. Things are just what they seem". > Had a LOT of thi
Forum: Author of the Month
15 years ago
Briffits
Growing up I kind of ignored music, my dad claimed to be tone deaf and there was never any music in the house other than those tinny AM transistor radios. Always thought I didn't have any musical roots, then a few years back John Zorn helped curate a collection of Carl Stallings' Looney Tune soundtracks incorporating alot of Raymond Scott's tunes and I realized those were my roots, but that's ano
Forum: Author of the Month
9 years ago
Briffits
I didn't even realize when I posted those, that yesterday was Howlin' Wolf's 100th birthday. Briffits
Forum: Misc.
9 years ago
Briffits
The second clip makes their interest in Mississippi John Hurt a great deal clearer than does their happy go lucky hits. Spoonful is a title that recurs in the blues as in this Willie Dixon penned tune by perhaps the greatest singer the blues produced. Of course that fellow's biggest influence was this guy from a generation earlier. The Lovin' Spoonful took their name from this lyric. Bri
Forum: Misc.
9 years ago
Briffits
It's one of those phenomena that you recognize when you see it, but is hard to describe. It's mottled, textural, pointillist, thick cloud formations that slightly resemble fish scales. The examples I have seen generally had a pinkish cast to them. Briffits
Forum: Misc.
9 years ago
Briffits
I'm actually quite impressed at the turnout of people protesting the altering of the mural and the honesty of the school official. It shows a lot of progress in the community's consciousness and the fact the bozo in question lost his radio slot is also a good sign. Briffits
Forum: Misc.
9 years ago
Briffits
It appears to be true and being that it occurred in Prescott does not surprise me. It's a rather isolated place. We had to drive my father there for treatment at the VA hospital, a number of times in the mid '70s, and it made Lake Havasu seem like a hip cosmopolitan enclave, which it decidedly wasn't. Briffits
Forum: Misc.
9 years ago
Briffits
Mahnmut wrote: > You two are internet brave so I have a challenge for you. Why > don't you find a member of the military and say to them face to > face and say to them what you have said here in this forum to > me? Let's see if you have the courage of your convictions I > believe you do not. I've known lots of Vietnam vets and none of them were very gung ho about the military, no
Forum: Misc.
9 years ago
Briffits
Richard Fusniak wrote: > My father didn't directly fight for freedom - he fought to save > his life when the Nazi's dropped bombs on his head. Big > difference. Which is actually true for every war and virtually every soldier isn't it. The politicians may sell the war on lofty abstractions, a soldier who survives war may look back upon it with rose colored lenses as a noble endeavor,
Forum: Misc.
9 years ago
Briffits
Mahnmut wrote: > Briffits are you actually saying that human rights are not > sacred. No, you apparently can't read and I don't bother arguing with functional illiterates and overgrown juvenile delinquents. > As for me I am done with the entire hypocritical lot of you > thank you for making me feel unwelcome on this board. You're welcome, boy nudge a jingo and his inner two year
Forum: Misc.
9 years ago
Briffits
carolb wrote: > Mahnmut wrote: > > > For the fact that you are allowed to question the military > and > > the government as well. If if it weren't for their sacrifices > > you'd be thrown in jail for asking why you should thank them. > > > Whose sacrifices, specifically, are you referring to? This is one of the biggest hunks of hooey ever spread through th
Forum: Misc.
9 years ago
Briffits
Remember this one? "Join the Army! Travel to exotic, distant lands. Meet exciting, unusual people... and kill them." Briffits
Forum: Misc.
9 years ago
Briffits
Deep1 wrote: > So, here I go: > > 1) Is there any way to make my wallpaper or profile comments > visible to only some, depending on the subject? You can restrict to friends only or friends of friends but that's as far as it goes. If you want to keep people separate, you may need more than one identity with different groups of friends in each. > > 2) Does FB understand basic
Forum: Misc.
9 years ago
Briffits
carolb wrote: > Should Americans, and indeed people of all nationalities, laugh > or cry? Laugh, as Mark Twain wrote "No church, no nobility, no royalty or other fraud, can face ridicule in a fair field and live." Briffits
Forum: Misc.
9 years ago
Briffits
ananda wrote: > The final vote is Friday, and it doesn't look good. Sad sad > times, both for Texas and for education in general. I would take heart that this has the potential of backfiring in quite dramatic ways. There's no better way to completely disillusion your would be brainwashed than making the lies you're telling them blatantly obvious. Propaganda that's completely removed from
Forum: Misc.
9 years ago
Briffits
That seems quite an evolution as well. I grew up in a very ethnically diverse, but still lily white suburb of Cleveland. We were taught that even protestants were heathens and it was a sin to attend their services. Jews, Blacks, Latinos, Asians and non-Christian faiths weren't even on the radar. It may have had as much to do with the insularity of the community as the sect. A friend who went to p
Forum: Misc.
9 years ago
Briffits
robyn wrote: > I taught in a Catholic School until recently (I'm not Catholic) > and the religion teachers thought statements like these were > funny. Times have changed for the better, or else it was a particularly liberal sect. Franciscan nuns had an inclination towards sadism, which would have put them in good stead as Marine DIs at Parris Island. No non-Catholic would have been all
Forum: Misc.
9 years ago
Briffits
Brilliant, that's almost to the standard of Eric Idle's bit, ranting about packaged holiday tours. Briffits
Forum: Misc.
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