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16 years ago
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Take a look at cardinal guzman post made on 11 JAN in this string/topic; there are two color coded elevation maps of the martian surface that shows the Hellas basin on the other side of the planet from the Mariner rift...also, you will see that the Mariner rift, at the far western end, has an extended line of ruptured crust that turns south, and then back east-northeast, The mariner rift is th
Forum: Science & Space
16 years ago
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I think the X-33 was cancelled before Bush, mainly because Lockheed couldn't seem to deliver on promises ( heck, their fuel tank couldn't even stand up to a partial pressure test before it started to delaminate/split...there was also a problem with the new linear aerospike engines...the lining of the ramps were also subject to too much erosion/delam). But you're right, it is interesting about hi
Forum: Science & Space
16 years ago
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It may well be a matter of burreaucracy and control... the National Reconaissance Office, National Security Agency, CIA, DIA would not be likely to release their own technology, in full resolution capability, for what those agencies would consider 'mundane' use. None the less, I must question why NASA hasn't included efforts to obtain images of whatever quality they could, of the ONLY definitly
Forum: Science & Space
16 years ago
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I like the comment about dino and human footprints found together. Of course, what is the anthro- and paleo- reaction? Not 'Wow! What a discovery!' But: "It MUST be a fake, because we KNOW it CAN"T be true." (Sigh...shrug...oh the pain, the pain.)
Forum: Science & Space
16 years ago
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Perhaps it is just a mesa, but until we have a landing/exploration ON-SITE, we are just making guesses; after all, we don't know what it looked like 1,000, or 100,000, or 10,000,000 years ago, or even 100 years ago, for that matter. Mars is a planet of extremes, and we don't know what the mesa/face's structure is, and therefore we can only make speculation as to weathering effects/previous appe
Forum: Science & Space
16 years ago
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GOOD link, cardinale! When viewed in this 'macro' context, it is evident that Mars was struck by very large body in its extreme remote past. And don't just view the Mariner Valley feature alone; in the images in the link, Mariner appears to be the northern edge of a roughly 3 sided flap of crust that was separated from the surrounding surface. That, combined with the Tharsis bulging, and the
Forum: Science & Space
16 years ago
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I have to agree that it looks likely to be the result of a massive overpressure underneath that region, splitting the surface; probably due to some catastrophic colision on the other side of the planet, which is what I think GH alluded to in the Mars Mystery book. Here's a question: If this is indeed what happened, what would be the effect on any 'civilisation' that may have existed at the time
Forum: Science & Space
16 years ago
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I've been wondering; why is it that we have never seen any detail images of the area where the Viking I/II, and mars Pathfinder missions landed? It seems to me that, rather than perform conjectural maneuvers about the effects of Mars' global storms, and the weathering effects of the environment there, that we have these 3 sets of machinery of ours on the surface...we know essentially where they
Forum: Science & Space
16 years ago
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Zosimos--quite right, we lack the innovators, or leaders; our corporations seem to be run by people of the 'cranius turdicus' school of management theory; those that aren't , follow the 'cerebellus flatulus' principles. CRANIUS TURDICUS adherents believe they know what they are doing is the the best option, and are decisive. They are sure of themselves, and have a high confidence in their abil
Forum: Global Village
16 years ago
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Yes, it was all a 'money game' or 'money SHELL game', I should say. I just get torqued-up when I see an organisation that is actually operating IN SPITE OF, as opposed to as a RESULT of the management. And that 12hr shift thing? They were taking a nose-dive on that...after it was implemented, aside from the demoralisation of the staff, making them hardly the most 'efficient' or 'loyal' workers
Forum: Global Village
16 years ago
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Just in case the readers of this board get the idea that only Bush (Shrub) has strange ideas about how to manage things, let me 'vent' about some of the things I witnessed in American business management over the years. First, amazing though it may be, I have to say that the management of our companies (especially industrial concerns) makes the government bureaucracies look SMART! (GAWD! Did I j
Forum: Global Village
16 years ago
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If you're not too afraid of the Homeland Paranoia Department, take a look over on aljazeera.net/english...they have some hilarious cartoons on Bush. hint: My favorite is the Martians putting up a sign reading "Sorry, no oil here".
Forum: Global Village
16 years ago
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Marin, I have a bad feeling that you have a point about clickingthe heels; 'Dubya' (W) gets a second term, I think I will defect to Ireland!
Forum: Global Village
16 years ago
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Martin...I took the test....OH MY GOD!! I'M GHANDI!!!
Forum: Global Village
16 years ago
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Just a question for curiosity, and possibly provovation... What is the difference between left and right...politically, that is. It seems to me that they are both power/control hungry, and abusers of power. Is it, perhaps, more realistic to take this linear idea of political division, from far left, through the center on the line, to the far right, and make it into a circular concept...connect
Forum: Global Village
16 years ago
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Magdalene, the journalist you're thinking of (Afghan connection) that was executed was Daniel Pearl, from the Wall Street Journal, who was lured into a trap and captured in Pakistan, and later executed. I didn't hear about him wearing a full body covering, which, BTW, in an Afghan context is called the burqa. Just FYI.
Forum: Global Village
16 years ago
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Since the Saudi population belongs to that 'other' religion, they must be enemies? I don't agree that is the Bushy's attitude, since he has maintained rather friendly relations with Turkey, Jordan, Kuwait, Qatar, Oman, Morocco, etc. The problem is, the House of Saud has its OWN opinions and outlook, just like the French; there is no automatic 'towing the line'. Gorge Bush (no typo) doesn't li
Forum: Global Village
15 years ago
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We are brutal, war-like, and kill others for their territory (or resources, may be a better term)...agreed. But this is not exclusive to humans. Most of the simians (monkeys, chimps) have been shown to be territorial, and violent in defense, even to the point of murdering competitors/intruders. But this possesive, violent activity... claiming, conquering, and defending resources exists among w
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
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Praetor: After reading the posts in this topic, I find myself wondering if your advocacy of genetics/paleontology fits a scientific or religious mold better. You see, your strident adherence to the standard dogma sounds more like a faith-based reaction than that of an open minded scientific inquirer. I know that in school, most of us have been taught the Theory of Evolution in such a way that
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
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Your remark about the lack of trees in the British Isles is interesting... I believe the main responsibility for the CURRENT relative lack of trees is the 'wooden walls'; that is, the wooden ships if the Royal Navy and Britain's merchant fleet. Wooden shipbuilding consumes a tremendous amount of trees for each vessel. But what was the forest cover during the time of the vitrified forts? Were th
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
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Joanne: Is it not racist and ethnocentric to deride the idea of a proto-civ spreading it's influence/culture worldwide? Setting aside the abuse and misuse of the idea (Nazis and 'white man's burden' colonialism), to deny or dismiss the concept so lightly appears to be very derisive toward the ancients... as in they 'simply COULDN'T' have done such a thing... the idea is bugus BECAUSE the ancien
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
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I agree with your 'religion' remark. I have commented before on the relationship of religious behaviors within the scientiffic community...and I'm not referring to the standard religions we commonly think of. If one examines some of the science fields, and their current theories, as well as the presentation of these theories, especially to the public, their 'faith-based' nature becomes apparen
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
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Joanne wrote that 'Modern anthropologists look at the historical record and explain it in a way that is consistent with the evidence...'. IMHO, from what I have observed, anthropologists and archaeologists interpret EVIDENCE in a way that is consistent with their THEORY; that is, their own beliefs and attutudes about the area/people they are studying are largely already FORMED, and their interpr
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
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Good point, 'hoho. If ever there was a 'hyper'-diffusion, it certainly occurred in the 'out of Africa; scenario.
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
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My reference to mediaeval Arabia referred to the time of Muhammed...the 600's, and the nomad Bedu, united by their prophet and formed into the powerful religious and military empire referred to.
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
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While reading throught the debate about diffusion and hyper-diffusion in another thread, i was struck by the apparent attitude of mutual exclusion of the two. I think the two are intricately connected. If we define diffusion as the transfer/expansion of elements of one culture into it's surrounding region (other countries, possibly spreading on a continental scale), and hyper-diffusion as the t
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
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Joanne: you remarked that the out-of-Africa idea was about '...biology, not cultural patterns.'. This leads to the question 'How do we define culture?' If it is defined as the set of beliefs, behaviours, and values of a group, it is reasonable to suspect the existence of primitive culture among the earliest of diaspora. But did 'culture' as we generally think of it, arise only after the earli
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
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Archae, your additional photo of Khafre is interesting, but the disproportion your refer to is not very great...certainly not ot the degree of Sphinx head/body differential; if it were disproportional to the same degree, I think the elbow would need to end at his nipple, which does not seem to be the case. When striking a similar pose, my wrist and part of my forearm does indeed rest on my thigh
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
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Gerd, I understand your viewpoint; however, I think it would better apply to a Sphinx carved as a relief sculpture into a rock wall. We have, however, a full, 360 degree sculpture of a crouching/resting leonine form...IMHO, this argues against taking only a frontal point of view in considering proportion of the statue. It is also somewhat difficult to compare a relatively unweathered head prop
Forum: Mysteries
16 years ago
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Archae, you make some very valid points in your original post; I can agree that it is very difficult to assess the relative importance of precipitation, salt exfoliation, surface runoff, and their cumulative effects over various posited time frames in relation to setting an age for the Sphinx. All, of course, had SOME degree of effect. However, when comparing the ground photo in you original po
Forum: Mysteries
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