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8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
Hi Don I have no comment to make with reference to your first question; much has been debated about whether several of the world's temple complexes around the world are ground maps of constellations. In fact, Graham Hancock wrote on this in his work, "Heavens Mirror" which synthesises some of the ideas he presents elsewhere in more detail in Fingerprints of the Gods and The Keeper of G
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
The fertility goddess Anqet is depicted in relief as holding an ankh, as is Tefnut who was depicted in fully human and leonine form, though in leonine form she can be distinguished from Sekhmet because Tefnut's ears are pointed while Sekhmet's are rounded. Most ancient Egyptian gods and goddesses have subsequently been associated and depicted with the ankh but I'm interpreting your question as m
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
Also, Wepwawet ("Opener of the Way") - a deity associated with war and death - famously carries the ankh. Check out the Ikhernofret stela (I-Kher-Nefert) erected in the 12th dynasty at Abydos. The stela contains much of the extant information about the "Passion of Osiris". The Stela of I-Kher-Nefert recounts the programme of events of the public elements during a five day fe
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
Horus and Ra, obviously; but Kneph and the goddess Hathor are also shown holding the ankh to the nose of Queen Mutemwia, mother of Amenhotep III, in the controversial "Divine Birth" relief at the temple of Amun at Luxor.
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
You are most welcome :)
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
According to an interpretation of the Ikhernofret Stela (circa 1850 BC) by Richard H. Wilkinson, Regents Professor of Egyptian Archaeology at the University of Arizona and Director of the University of Arizona Egyptian Expedition, Osiris' death and resurrection was celebrated in a 5 day festival known as the "Passion Plays." Osiris is entombed on the second day and remains so until the
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
Another citation to support the idea of the resurrection of Osiris after 3 days: According to an interpretation of the Ikhernofret Stela (circa 1850 BC) by Richard H. Wilkinson, Regents Professor of Egyptian Archaeology at the University of Arizona and Director of the University of Arizona Egyptian Expedition, Osiris' death and resurrection was celebrated in a 5 day festival known as the "P
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
It is my understanding that the period between Osiris' death and resurrection varies, depending on the myth. For example, as "the Osiris"/deceased in the Egyptian funerary texts, as well as the nightly sun, he dies and is resurrected on a daily basis. The annual death-and-resurrection period, however, is commonly depicted as three days. One such citation is Reverend Dr. Alfred Berthol
Forum: Mysteries
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