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2 years ago
skakos
Perhaps science fiction writers simply know the future somehow. Perhaps instinct and intuition are tools to view what will come next even without understanding it or being able to articulate it properly. We have seen such remarkable examples of predictions in mathematics for example, where great mathematicians formulated theorems which took hundreds of years to be proven... Or perhaps we read
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
skakos
I am not sure that all the laws of physics we currently have applied to the very beginning of the universe as well...
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
skakos
The greatest mystery of all is that there is no mystery. This life is ours. And we must learn how to deal with it.
Forum: Mysteries
3 years ago
skakos
I used the word “judging” as in “form an opinion or conclusion about”. The question is mainly related to how can anyone believe that someone else has a specific experience. Our experiences are our own (this is a tautology) and yet we expect others to believe them so that we can live and communicate with them in the context of society. The question is also related to dreams per se: How can we “kno
Forum: Science & Space
3 years ago
skakos
The question is much more general and philosophical: Can in any case random exist? The case of Deep Blue shows that it all comes down to the beliefs a person has for core philosophical issues which are currently unsolved. Fate vs. Free will, Determinism vs. (whatever) etc, they all show that the universe can be understood only through the irrational thinking which accepts all of the above notions
Forum: Science & Space
3 years ago
skakos
The point is that the move was not anticipated by its designers. Hence the "random". The question is more general and philosophical: Can random exist at all in a deterministic world?
Forum: Science & Space
3 years ago
skakos
Do bearded dragons dream? Researchers describe the existence of REM and slow-wave sleep in the Australian dragon, with many common features with mammalian sleep: a phase characterized by low frequency/high amplitude average brain activity and rare and bursty neuronal firing (slow-wave sleep); and another characterized by awake-like brain activity and rapid eye movements. [source] Like Jung who
Forum: Science & Space
3 years ago
skakos
In May 1997, an IBM supercomputer known as Deep Blue beat then chess world champion Garry Kasparov, who had once bragged he would never lose to a machine. Kasparov and other chess masters blamed the defeat on a single move made by the IBM machine. At the beginning of the second game the computer made a sacrifice that seemed to hint at its long-term strategy. Kasparov and many others thought the m
Forum: Science & Space
3 years ago
skakos
There are many unsolved questions in human history. However the fact that they are unsolved does not make them "mysteries". Sometimes the simplest events can lead to confusing results - especially for the historians of the future. A simple disaster could explain something that we now see as a "mystery", a simple change of power or a shift of the interest of people to new thing
Forum: Mysteries
3 years ago
skakos
A great chance for some alchemical experiments...
Forum: Science & Space
3 years ago
skakos
One more good example of how scientists have been cut-off from philosophy. We do now know what life is, we do not know what death is and yet we will soon be proclaiming our selves gods resurrecting people. And we thought Jesus Christ was too much...
Forum: Science & Space
3 years ago
skakos
What do you mean by "nothing is missing"? Astronomers recently "discovered" that about 90% of the universe (+/- 5% does not make a difference) is "dark" (either energy or matter). The fact that we have named that missing part does not change the fact that we do not know anything about it.
Forum: Science & Space
3 years ago
skakos
How arrogant that people who cannot even predict what will the the weather of tomorrow, have the nerve to claim that they "know" how the climate changes on a global scale...
Forum: Science & Space
3 years ago
skakos
brett z Wrote: ------------------------------------------------------- > Hi Avocet, > > > Lets call the 'Fluid of particles' the ether. > > Yes, the idea of an underlying fluid nature of > space is interesting. > > Do you think the fluid of particles is the medium > through which electromagnetic waves (eg light) > propagate? This was an idea also so
Forum: Science & Space
3 years ago
skakos
laughin Wrote: ------------------------------------------------------- > carolb Wrote: > -------------------------------------------------- > ----- > > Jonny, another question or two: > > > > What practical use, if any, is the discovery of > > these waves? What can scientists do now, with > > this knowledge? > > > > How did they kno
Forum: Science & Space
3 years ago
skakos
The limit of the speed of light is a limit with all too many exceptions. The case of a "wave" which propagates FTL is one of them. It may seem that there is no "relativity violation" because after all no matter is transmitted faster than light, but on the other hand again we have the transmission of some kind of "information" faster than light...
Forum: Science & Space
3 years ago
skakos
An explosion of such an amount of mass is indeed a mystery. Simple questions are the harder to answer...
Forum: Science & Space
3 years ago
skakos
I must say I am confused with the description. Can't we have it in simple steps?
Forum: Science & Space
3 years ago
skakos
"Assessments of the risk posed by near-Earth objects ignore the possibility of a giant comet entering the inner solar system. Bill Napier, David Asher, Mark Bailey and Duncan Steel examine the likelihood and potential consequences of the appearance of such a centaur" (source) More and more scientists discover the violence in the solar system... Fewer scientists now laugh
Forum: Science & Space
3 years ago
skakos
It depends on what you call "God"...
Forum: Science & Space
3 years ago
skakos
What is "fact"? Science just creates models to describe things. Are gravitational fields a "fact"? No. They are just a model created by humans to describe things we see. It is no more "fact" that the "curved time-space" of Einstein is, which also explains the same thing. And imagination is not "real"? Really? Most scientists are great scientist
Forum: Science & Space
3 years ago
skakos
I think we all agree that religiosity is not an obstacle for scientists. But I go one step further, by saying that religiosity is actually a kind of prerequisite for science. Let me explain my self... Throughout science history, science had God as its starting point. The notion of us, humans, being made in the image of God gave scientists like Newton the power and will to try to understand
Forum: Science & Space
3 years ago
skakos
Religiosity does not interfere in scientific thinking any different than any other belief. (atheistic beliefs included) What I wanted to pinpoint with the abovementioned research was to show that there is no incompatibility between religious belief and being a scientist. In fact, most prominent scientists have been religious so I could say that believing in God is rather a consequence of being a
Forum: Science & Space
4 years ago
skakos
A 2005 survey of scientists at top research universities found that 38% had a religious affiliation and more than 73% believe that religions convey important truths. The same study showed that religiosity in the home as a child is the most important predictor of present religiosity among scientists. (and not education or anything else)
Forum: Science & Space
4 years ago
skakos
Science itself is based on the idea of understanding God's mind. PS. I will try to find other research related to the subject and post them. Of course a very significant percentage of scientists are believers.
Forum: Science & Space
4 years ago
skakos
Earth's orbit of course plays a role in the climate. How much it affects the climate and how needs to be analyzed though. And surely only after many years of observations will we be able to draw safe conclusions.
Forum: Science & Space
4 years ago
skakos
These were not assumptions. They were a mix of facts and opinion based on those facts. If you have any different view of science today and how it should work feel free to share it. The main discussion here is how assumptions for how the solar system was created have turned into DOGMAS.
Forum: Science & Space
4 years ago
skakos
Are you just trying to be funny? These are not arguments against what I said. You just copy-pasted my post. Come on. You can do better than that.
Forum: Science & Space
4 years ago
skakos
And you were in the process of pointing them out but the computer stopped working?
Forum: Science & Space
4 years ago
skakos
Science is and must be based on assumptions. It cannot create theories based on... nothing. There must be some axioms to start with. What is important I would say is that scientists today tend to believe axioms/ assumptions to be "TRUE". And that is where dogmatism actually starts. A true scientist would immediately publish the data, given some reasonable time to also publish his
Forum: Science & Space
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