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6 days ago
paxton
Thank you Lobsang for your very interesting and informative post(s). I am the wiser for reading and will be more cautious about taking Allen's work at face value. Perhaps I have made too much in my own mind about the nature of Virgo as a virgin, Aratus refers to her as "Maiden", but he is more concerned about her sadness at the loss of life's quality since "The Golden Age". Ne
Forum: Mysteries
9 days ago
paxton
Hi Lobsang. Yes I agree with you. The problem this presents is outlined in Richard Hinckley Allen's remarkable book "Star Names, Their Lore and Meaning". He finds reference to Virgo as Istar, Isis, Demeter, Arista, Ceres, Erigone and at least twenty more "maidens". The view of Virgo as "A maiden" is all but universal, including the Chinese She Sang Neu and the Turcom
Forum: Mysteries
17 days ago
paxton
Hi Hendrik, Thanks again for the links. I only needed to read one in order to see how badly you have misunderstood the nature of eclipses. You have imagined that because a total solar eclipse was viewed at 30 degrees north the sun itself must have been vertically above this latitude at the time. This is a total misunderstanding of the mechanics of eclipses on your part. There was a total eclipse
Forum: Mysteries
18 days ago
paxton
Hi Hendrik. Thanks for the link. Regarding the account given on the link, as far as I can see the account of the measurements taken to establish star coordinates demonstrates the very precise way that the Earth's relationship to the stars has been established. At no point does it say "Oh Dear" we have found our estimation of precession is entirely wrong. In other words the link simply c
Forum: Mysteries
20 days ago
paxton
Hi Hendrik. Thanks for the links to your webpages. I have done my best to read and understand your thesis, but again I cannot believe it. You say at one point : "Consequently changing orientation into space, the Poles thereby wander in a circle that, in actual fact, is 72° in diameter and not concentric - determined by the sum of obliquity parameters 14° & 58° respective of the Eclip
Forum: Mysteries
22 days ago
paxton
Hi Hendrik, Thanks for the link. I have read your hypothesis and see that you are of the opinion that the polar axis of the Earth alters obliquity alarmingly: "14 degrees and 58 degrees obliquity respectively - the stable and unstable peaks of precession." This flies in the face of so much scientific evidence that I cannot understand how you can believe that, as you put it, at s
Forum: Mysteries
23 days ago
paxton
hendrik dirker Wrote: ------------------------------------------------------- > On the subject pertaining a former N.Pole - think > again... > Had the entire crust 'slipped' (in context of > Earth's mantle), as suggested, the cardinal > directions -- incl. the N.Pole -- relative the > site would be unaffected. Equinox remains > unchanged thereby. Only Solstice incurs
Forum: Mysteries
25 days ago
paxton
Hi sunny-eyes, thanks for the link. I had already seen the video because I was following your comments on the Hamlet's Mill discussion. In fact it was that discussion that prompted this thread. Thanks again.
Forum: Mysteries
25 days ago
paxton
Hi Mike D. Sorry for the delay responding to your question. I am not clear what you are asking Vis : "angular sector in background." As you probably know the observations concerning the Northern Solstice and the Zodiac described in the first post will all repeat after a full cycle of precession (about 26,000 years). The intervals of time between the bright stars rising due east will var
Forum: Mysteries
26 days ago
paxton
Hi Susan The original thread that I posted has nothing to do with Horoscopes or the positions of planets. You appear to have veered off the topic in order to express your opinions about these things, and your strong conviction that Horoscopes are nonsense. Your views on Horoscopes may be of interest to some readers, but this topic is about astronomical observations. The point I am making i
Forum: Mysteries
27 days ago
paxton
Hi Susan, Belief in Astrology may depend on the definition of the word. Oxford Dictionary: the study of the movements and relative positions of celestial bodies interpreted as having an influence on human affairs and the natural world. It is undeniable that celestial bodies influence the natural world, but I think your exclamation marks are referring to Daily Mail Horoscopes and the like.
Forum: Mysteries
29 days ago
paxton
The constellations of the Zodiac were only given official linear boundaries in 1928, this was done in order to define precisely which stars belonged in Gemini, which in Taurus and so on. These straight line boundaries are seen on star maps today and were a ‘best effort’ to identify the limits of each ancient constellation; although it is not known where the earliest divisions were drawn, or if th
Forum: Mysteries
5 weeks ago
paxton
Thanks for the link Yve. It's astonishing to see what was achieved at Grimes Grave with such a limited Neolithic toolbox. There seems little doubt that the Grimes Grave site was created for the purpose of flint mining, but the holes around Durrington Walls do not appear to have this purpose. There is something clearly non-random about their distribution, yet the geometric arrangement does not app
Forum: Mysteries
5 weeks ago
paxton
information on the "shafts"
Forum: Mysteries
6 weeks ago
paxton
Can anyone think of an explanation for the newly discovered "shafts" in the Stonehenge area? Are there any precedents for Neolithic holes of this size (ten meters wide, five meters deep)?
Forum: Mysteries
6 weeks ago
paxton
You could try James Q. Jacobs website. He has plotted hundreds of ancient sites on Google Earth.
Forum: Mysteries
1 year ago
paxton
Quote : Rob, The problems that scientists have with these studies is that the size of the effect is very small. Validating a finding with a meta-analysis is very weak support--and positive correlational effects are hard to interpret. One should be looking for large significant differences between groups. Ray Surely not Ray? A 7-10% deviation from "normal" is more than suff
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
paxton
What an extraordinary work. Thank you molder for bringing it to our attention. It may still take time, but this paper should signal the end of the Ruggles monopoly. It is made perfectly clear that Ruggles was mistaken, the topography of the entire landscape was being adopted for astronomy, (though I saw no mention of Thom). At last there is the recognition that these monuments are about topograph
Forum: Mysteries
1 year ago
paxton
Hi Dave, It is interesting that your measurement from Silbury Hill summit to the Marlborough Mound summit differs from that of Robin Heath's by 8 megalithic yards and yet you both find exactly the same circumference for a circle using these differing distances as a diameter. I think the Neolithic builders would be aware of these measures and a lot more besides. I don't think all that effort was
Forum: Mysteries
1 year ago
paxton
Hi Dave, Robin Heath has recently used the measure from Silbury Hill to the Marlborough Mound to produce an "Avebury Temple". Your measurements in feet differ a little, but both are apparently relevant. There is much about measurement that I fail to grasp, but megalithic symbols on lines are easier. In my opinion Robin Heath has an extraordinary grip on this subject. Thanks for the l
Forum: Mysteries
1 year ago
paxton
Thanks for the links and the reading list Dave. I've been mainly concerned with the alignment of monuments with topographical extreme points in the landscape and how these natural points prove to be ordered into isosceles and right triangles. I generally measure these in nautical miles. As you can see the UK monuments repeatedly identify high points and western extreme points by alignment. Inter
Forum: Mysteries
1 year ago
paxton
This link shows what appears to be a highly sophisticated Neolithic language expressed with lines in the landscape. neolithic language Paxton
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
paxton
Hi Arthur, Thank you for directing us to the weblinks which give a very clear and intriguing insight into your new approach to ancient monuments. The monument builders may have had an intimate knowledge of the surface of the earth and, as you say: “It is amazing that the territory outlined by the Yonaguni Geoglyph matches, almost exactly, with the territory Japan was attempting to occupy in
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
paxton
EdMalkowski wrote: > > What I am particularly interested in is why symbol and > symbolism is so important with respect to the nature of > knowledge. Is there any difference in our understanding of > symbols today as opposed to ancient times? > > Your thoughts... Hi Ed I was fortunate enough to study semiotics under Victor Burgin in London. It was fascinating because he il
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
paxton
Hi Carol, Yes that makes sense. Sorry I don't have animations, but fixing Orion's belt on your meridian and observing it over 26,000 years you are right it will rise and fall in the sky and alter its angle to the meridian, tilting too and fro as you say. At the top and bottom of their limits on the meridian the stars will climb and fall relatively slowly, at midpoint they will climb or fall relat
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
paxton
Hi Carol, I’m not sure if I can write an adequate explanation of the movement of stars measured over time at rising on the horizon, but here goes. The effect of precession on any given star is not unlike the effect of the seasons on the sun. The sun’s ‘movement’ measured daily at rising over the year is seen to be at its greatest at the equinoxes when it moves relatively rapidly heading north o
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
paxton
Hi Harry, I’ve been reading ‘Deluge’ with interest and would like to make a couple of observations where I think the reader may be misdirected. You say on page 223: “The vernal equinox then resides in each constellation for about 2160 years.” Comment: The vernal equinox resides in each constellation for periods varying by thousands of years. The equinox resides in each Sign of the Zodiac for
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
paxton
Hi Harry In ‘Measurements of the Gods’ regarding Tau Hercules, Canopus, Vega and Thuban you say: “Investigations….have revealed that a Pole Star is viable in ancient tradition for three degrees (measured horizontally) either side of pole position or a total of 1000 years.” Thanks for the reply to my earlier question, but I cannot find the answer I was asking for amongst the references you give
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
paxton
Hi Harry, I am trying to get to grips with the astronomy regarding Pole Stars in relation to your flood theory but I am not sure how you are defining a Pole Star. In ‘Measurements of the Gods’ page 237 you say: “Investigations….have revealed that a Pole Star is viable in ancient tradition for three degrees (measured horizontally) either side of pole position or a total of 1000 years.” In ‘Del
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
paxton
Hi Graham I saw the taped interview before it was temporarily removed, it was wonderful. Like Karen I will also highly recommend it. Your scope and your breadth of knowledge are awesome, it was a great education to listen to you, thank you. Paxton
Forum: Author of the Month
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