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14 years ago
Nolondil
Bent wrote: > ArmchairObserver wrote: > > > Virginia is hardly on a religious quest. If you look at the > > information that she has spent the last 30 years trying to > get > > out, it is about very early man with a site date of > > around 200,000 years+. I think that alone highly diverges > from > > "creationist" thinking. > > >
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
Nolondil
Genesis Veracity wrote: > The dirty little secret of the Big Bang Theory is that it > presupposes two contradictory notions: > > #1. That the universe has a beginning-center, and thus an edge > (bounded universe). > > #2. That the universe is boundless. > > The contradictory boundless universe of presupposition #2 is > the dirty little secret because with the
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
Nolondil
Claude wrote: > Well thanks for the insight Dr Watson I had missed the post on > psychedelic drugs that's why it didn't register with me. > I wait the new book of Graham to call you Sherlock Holmes, lol. > Ding! Graham Hancock has posted to this thread and clearly stated what I had deduced from his posts. He was "researching" by taking hallucinogens.
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
Nolondil
Sometimes you have to go back to the 'background' assumptions in order to see what is wrong with an apparently insoluble problem. Why does the crust have to move? Why can't the whole planet shift on its axis? The reason for the focus on crustal slippage seems to be that it's simply regarded as impossible for the entire earth to shift. Too much 'angular momentum' change to be believable, I guess.
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
Nolondil
Lee McGiffen wrote: > > Could it possibly have any connection with this...?! > > > > Christian catacomb motif > (St Domitilla, early 4th century) > > (Stolen from > ) > That sure looks like a representation of the astrological sign Pisces to me. It's not strictly 'accurate' since the fish are not directly facing each other in the actual constellation, but
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
Nolondil
HarryWJYoung wrote: > Fisherman, I've been doing some cursory research on Jaynes and > his bicameral mind theory. Controversial indeed. > > He postulates that the Greeks of the Iliad had no conscious > mind, no introspection. I'm not clear on whether he means the > fictional (or perhaps real, we may never know) characters or > people generally of that time. If it's the lat
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
Nolondil
The semitic Moon god has nothing to do with the English word 'sin'. This was chosen to translate the Greek word 'hamartia' which means more-or-less 'missing the mark' and so by association 'error'. The first translation of the Bible by William Tyndale used 'trespass' and that's why many traditional worship services (such as the Lord's Prayer) still use 'tresspass' instead of 'sin' -- the popular
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
Nolondil
photon wrote: > > In 'Underworld' is mentioned some skulls that lacked cranial > lines. I am no anthropologist, am was wondering if anyone > knows, for certain, whether or not there are any known hominids > that have this feature? > A skull completely without the cranial sutures (places where the skull bones grew together) would seem to be impossible. Bones just can't grow
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
Nolondil
Laird Scranton wrote: > Many of the most ancient traditions involve deep symbolism that > is reserved for priests and initiates. The prevailing view is > that knowledge was hidden in order to preserve it. However, > when you examine this proposition, it may not really hold > water. > > First of all, ask yourself how many poems you know which are > over 100 years old.
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
Nolondil
Jaimi2 wrote: > Are you sure it's a raven and not a dove? > > Oh, it's a raven alright. This is based on a Biblical passage. Many of the stories of 'saints' are built from re-using elements found in the Bible. I Kings 17:4, 5, 6 017:004 And it shall be, that thou shalt drink of the brook; and I have commanded the ravens to feed thee there. 017:005 So he went and did accord
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
Nolondil
The hand and the eye are both very basic symbols. Being parts of the human body they are necessarily common to all human cultures across both time and geography. The one is the symbol of will since it's a bit difficult to do anything without using your hands. (The relatively few exceptions are simply proof of the rule. :) The other is a symbol of consciousness since where our attention goes so t
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
Nolondil
Yes, he is thinking in a European context, but there is a difference between 'meant to be Europe' and matching the maps! They DO NOT match! This is plainly obvious for anyone who looks. Tolkien admitted that he wanted the maps to match but he thought of this too late in the process (with The Hobbit already published, for example) to make it work. So the correspondence is approximate only. I am h
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
Nolondil
Yes, as a European born in the late nineteenth century Tolkien grew up in a cultural atmosphere with many racist stereotypes that we reject today. But he was actually relatively aware of this. The elephants/mumaks actually strike me as more an echo of Hannibal and the Punic wars where elephants were used. But he admits in the Letters that his interpretation of an Orc based on European perception
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
Nolondil
Yes, this has been known for some time. One of the names Tolkien invented for Numenor was 'Atalante' (which he translated as 'The Downfallen') and he tells a story several times in the Letters of having an 'Atlantis' dream of a huge wave overwhelming the landscape. The shape of Middle-earth actually doesn't look very much like Europe at all as far as the actual landscape. It's the political/cult
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
Nolondil
There are large banks only 6 feet or so underwater in the North Sea. I've been waiting for some billionare like Rupert Murdoch to enclose one in dikes & fill it in to make his own private island. Surely someone will do this eventually? :) A private island in the midst of the EU! It's just too lucrative an opportunity.
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
Nolondil
SunSword wrote: > FYI for all -- a "dry dock" is a special kind of boat dock, > such that when water is pumped out of it, it rises, thus > raising the boat within it completely out of the water. Such a > dock would not be made of stone. A floating wooden drydock > could alternatively use ballast to sink it, the boat could sail > in, and the ballast could be removed to
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
Nolondil
japixley wrote: > Here is an excerpt from the website that has been mentioned > previously on this thread: > 'Early Christianity possessed three main strands: the Jewish > one (led by James, Jesus' brother), the Pauline one (created by > Paul himself and now represented by the Orthodox and Roman > Catholic Churches), and the Gnostic one (at least some of whom > followed St J
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Nolondil
Citizen Attorney wrote: > Interesting post. My question about huge catostrophies > continues to be where are the bodies that perished during these > events. > > Suppose we didn't clean up the bodies after the recent tsunami. > These bodies would have drifted to where? wouldn't someone five > thousand years later be able to find remnants of 125,ooo > bodies? Not necessa
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Nolondil
Quetzalcoatl wrote: > Are you sure Robert Bauval took that picture? :) Notice that his hands are not visible in the photo. You are familiar with the concept of remote controls, surely? They aren't just for televisions. You can get high-end camera equipment with radio controls so you can operate it from a distance.
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Nolondil
4580. Re: Jesus
Shesemba wrote: > > AND I JUST REALIZED I LENT THEM TO SOMEONE TWO YEARS AGO AND > NEVER GOT THEM BACK!!!! Let this be a lesson to you. There is no such thing as 'lending' books. You never get back a book when you 'lend' it to someone! I lost quite a few books by 'loan' and finally swore off the practice of giving my books away. If you want something in my library I'll gladly tell you
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Nolondil
Halbared wrote: > In a discussion on another board, I have chatted aboot the > recent C4 programme aboot Dan Brown's novel, the Da Vinci Code. > It was put to me that Gnostics might be anti-women like the > Catholic Church, has anyone read anything aboot this? First of all, there is no single movement called 'gnostics'. There were many factions with widely divergent views that were
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Nolondil
modeldon1 wrote: > NGS yesterday had a tv special about the underwater site. It > IS articial. Period. it is not supposed to be there. > Whatever it is will wait for a lot more investigation but the > legend of sunken lost cities has been fufilled. Please give exact details. Time of broadcast, any online links?
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Nolondil
How is that different from 'extra-human origins'? The Neanderthals were in the genus homo, but were a different species. Extra-human. Other than human.
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Nolondil
Part of the article is available online at NewScientist.com: This will certainly make the 'hidden aristocracy' crowd like Nicholas de Vere happy. It will be easy to spin this as 'scientific confirmation' of the extra-human origins of this hidden bloodline he claims is behind so much in ancient history.
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Nolondil
Do you want larger numbers of pixels or colors? The largest full color image I can find doesn't show its 'resolution' (pixels per inch) when saved to disk so I don't know how sharp it is pixel-wise. On the other hand, there is a very high pixel count (2000x1951 pixels) black & white version available at: And there are some extreme closeups of certain parts of the painting, as well, incl
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Nolondil
Kboldt wrote: > Hi Steve, > > The 'Dog' Star, the brightest star in the constellation Canis > Major, is probably where the Dogon Tribes received their name. > Since dog is a word in English I very much doubt that the Dogon were named based on this word. They are reported to have migrated to their current location around the 10th century, when 'English' was still 'Aenglish' an
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Nolondil
IanG wrote: > Hi Ian, > > > Then there are the conundrums: How did we discover metals > could be extracted from ore if we exposed the rocks to > temperatures above the normal heat a fire produces? Where did > the weaving of fibres originate to form cloth or the knotting > of thread to form nets? Also, it seems there was some wider > knowledge of the geometry of th
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Nolondil
The story you are repeating comes originally from Plato's Symposium dialogue. It's one of the discourses given on the origin and nature of 'love' (eros). In the original, though, the pairs were not excusively male and female. Some were, but some were also male-male and female-female. Aristophanes professed to open another vein of discourse; he had a mind to praise Love in another way, unlike th
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Nolondil
The temple of Angor Wat in Cambodia aligns to the constellation of Draco as it was in 10500 BC much like the Pyramid complex at Giza aligns to Orion in 10500 BC.
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
Nolondil
Claude wrote: > Hi Michael, > > I can assure you I found that of great interest and thanks for > opening new doors for me. > Your version of Immaculate conception surely makes more sense > this way. > Just have a problem with the meaning of "sly" as english is my > second language. Could you elaborate on the meaning of a "sly > man" please ? >
Forum: Mysteries
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