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2 years ago
JonnyMcA
Continued discussion from here <; below. Please try to keep things civil. Jonny
Forum: Mysteries
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
SyFyGuy2 You have crossed the line of decency with this post (and others on this thread). I have suspended your posting privileges for the period of 1 month. Jonny
Forum: Mysteries
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
This is the article also see here And here And the research paper is here Abstract Models of debris disk morphology are often focused on the effects of a planet orbiting interior to or within the disk. Nonetheless, an exterior planetary-mass perturber can also excite eccentricities in a debris disk, via Laplace–Lagrange secular perturbations in the coplanar case or Kozai–Lidov
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
QuoteAs in the original Rosetta mission thread on this board i predicted the harpoon would fail because the 'cometary' asteroid was hard rock. QuoteI predicted the landing would be difficult and that harpooning into the surface would not work, it would be too hard. It happened just as i predicted. Except it did not happen just as you predicted, as the harpoons malfunctioned and failed to fir
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
Hi Duane, Did you even think about that comment before you hit the "post button", or are you being deliberately obtuse? Think about what was said in the posts above. What drives the magnetic field? Convection of a conducting fluid. What causes convection? A temperature difference between different regions within the fluid. What were we discussing? The rocky planets only, tho
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
From the paper I linked to QuoteIt is argued above that Venus lacks a geodynamo because it lacks plate tectonics. On Earth, cold subducting plates probably penetrate to near the core-mantle boundary, thus increasing the core-mantle temperature contrast and the heat flux out of the core (Davies, 1993). Hofmeister (1999) concluded that the likely heat flux across the ~200 km thick layer at the
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
Ok then, just one last dance, then you must let me get on with more productive things ;) What creates a planetary magnetic field? Convection of A hot liquid (or fluid) core. What creates convection? Primarily a temperature gradient within the fluid. So this may explain why Mars doesn't have a geomagnetic field, because it's outer core has cooled to the extent that it is no longer fluid
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
Sigh... So you supply a link that alludes to the Parker Dynamo Model and haven't actually looked it up? But for the "Too Long, Didn't read" crowd. The magnetic field of a planet comes from the convection currents of the hot ionic liquid near to the core . As the paper I linked to suggests, rotation speed may only responsible for the geometry of the field, suggesting a greater emphasis
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
Libration is "An apparent or real oscillation of the moon, by which parts near the edge of the disc that are often not visible from the earth sometimes come into view." And as you can see in the animation I supplied there is an oscillation (or apparent wobble) of the face of the moon as perceived from the earth, which comes about in part due to the rotation of the moon on its own
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
If Tesla said it, then it must be right, as all appeals to authority are. Except that it is true rotation about its own axis and no amount of imagining concrete wheels will change that fact. We have direct evidence that the moon rotates, namely libration. Libration is the small observed wobble of the moon as it goes through its phases. This libration occurs due to the moons elliptical
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
HI duane, Unfortunately you have not understood that quote. Nowhere does it state that a planet must rotate faster than the star to generate a magnetic field. it simply states that the earth and Jupiter rotate faster than the sun. You are inferring information from this simple paragraph that is not there. The actual information is merely telling us that magnetic fields of the sun and plane
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
Daniel your statemwnt is nonsense. Tidally locked objects do rotate around their own axis. How else would they show the same face to their parent body. It has been explained above and it has been illustrated in the youtube video provided by Carol. It is your choice as to whether you blinker yourself to this simple fact or not. Jonny
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
How about you re-read this link that ou provided and quote exactly where it states that a planet must rotate faster than its star to generate its own magntic field? My post was not about whether the planets harbour life but correcting your apparent implication that the exo-planets are not rotating and so do not generate a magnetic field. See your point 2 in this post . The clock example was t
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
Hi Duane, You have made the statement that tidally locked planets cannot generate magnetic fields in a different post on this thread. You may not have read my reply on this yet otherwise you would not have made the same statement again in the above post. To reiterate, the generation of a planetary magnetic field is due to the rotation a hot liquid core withon the planet. You seem to think t
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
Point number 2. Tidal locking is not zero rotation, quite the opposite. In order for a planet to be tidally locked to its star, its rotational period must be equal to its orbital period. Ergo if the Trappist-1 stars are tidally locked, they must be rotating with the same period as the irbital period. In other words, the length of one sidereal day on the planet (note not solar day) will be the
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
Why do you question the 40 light years figure? This system is close enough to use the parallax method of distance determination, and so the 40 light years (actually 39.5 +/- 1.3 light years) measurement is not solely dependant upon any astrophysical assumptions such as absolute magnitudes or spectral classes etc (i.e photometric distance determination). Do you not accept the parallax method of d
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
Hi Daniel, I have edited the K2 link now. To save you going back to teh post here it is . The reason it didnt work before is because when I pasted it into my text I did so between the words K2 and Mission, and the Mission word became the end of the url. So it should work now. Jonny
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
Yes you did say that it is ALMOST tidally locked, not that it IS tidally locked. The point I was making in reply to Kristin was that it is not even ALMOST tidally locked due to its opposite rotation to its orbit. If it was almost tidally locked then one would expect its solar day length to be close to its solar year length, and it isn't as there is a difference of around 108 days. The thing
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
Exactly so. An object is only tidally locked when its period of rotation equals its orbital period around its primary body. In the case of Venus, its rotational period is -243.025 days and its orbital period is 224.701 days. The magnitude of these numbers would suggest that it is close to tidal locking BUT we need to take into account the fact that Venus' rotation is pro-grade with respect to
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
If you go to here and scroll down to the Extended Data Figures and Tables, you can click on the extended figures. Under these figures is teh option to download the data. Also see here for figure 1 from the paper which has the option to download the data below it. As for data from the actual observations (if you mean the raw data from each observing session), that may not be widely availa
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
Comment 1: yes it is possible since the star is much less massive than our sun. Comment 2: It is only a "may" because there is no data to confirm such a supposition, though such a supposition is likely given the masses and distances involved. And no, tidal locking is not confined to moons of planets. It can occur in any system where the tidal forces are large enough. See for exa
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
This fluctuation is extremely small, and more importantly the variation in the rate was observed to be cyclic (see previous posts here and links within ). So while the decay rate would fluctuate over a year, its mean decay rate would have remained constant. So it would not have any effect upon radiocarbon dating of archaeological specimens. See an up to date article on the effects of solar m
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
These events do not affect radiocarbon dating at all. The reason being is that variations in atmospheric radiocarbon (which are then imprinted upon living creatures) are short-circuited by radiocarbon calibration. When you want to get a calendar date through radiocarbon dating, you find its radiocarbon age, and use the radiocarbon calibration curve to read off the calendar date. The radiocarbo
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
No, because God is omniscient and would know better not to do so ;) Jonny
Forum: Gunpowder, Treason & Plot
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
OP = Opening or Original Post. Jonny
Forum: Paranormal & Supernatural
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
Well, as I mention above, how about you discuss the evidence that supports your claim in the OP? Thats a good a place to begin as any. Jonny
Forum: Paranormal & Supernatural
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
Since this is a discussion forum, how about you discuss your evidence for your claims, and how it is that you know what you know, rather than inviting people to contact you. Jonny
Forum: Paranormal & Supernatural
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
Some professional researchers share your view points regarding storms and their effects upon earthquakes as outlined in this nature article, Slow earthquakes triggered by typhoons. Also see this piece by Bill McGuire writing in the Guardian a few months ago regarding how climate (and hence severe weather) can influence geophysical catastrophes Jonny
Forum: Science & Space
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
Being a circumciser doesnt pay well, but I hear they get to keep the tips! Jonny
Forum: Misc.
2 years ago
JonnyMcA
Hi Lee, Your post can be used to illustrate exactly what I was pointing out above. Now, before I continue, I just want to emphasise that I have taken no ill will from your post, and nor do I think that you are calling me (or my colleagues at the time) psychopaths, or psychological abusers. the following is simply to illustrate how unpleasantness can ignite within a discussion, and spread acr
Forum: Global Village
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