History :  The Official GrahamHancock.com forums
For the discussion of general and orthodox history from the advent of writing up to mid 20th Century, i.e. 3,200BC up to World War II. 
Welcome! Log InRegister
Go to: Forum HomeBoardNew Topic

Current Page: 2 of 245
Results 31 - 60 of 7321
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
Hi Andy, Good to see that you are still lurking around :D The archaeological evidence suggests that the island of Santorini was likely abandoned before the Bronze Age eruption of Thera. It is likely that there were many precursors to the eruption, which caused the popular ion to sensibly flee. There is some evidence to suggest that it may have been in a hurry, but that it appears that the
Forum: History
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
Hi Mike, One of the questions to ask regarding the tsunami hypothesis is whether the is coeval evidence for a tsunami in the surrounding coastlines such as Sicily, South Italy, Tunisia, Libya etc? Another question to ask is what evidence is there that the proposed tsunami occurred around 2300 BC, and not later after the abandonment of the temple structures? Jonny
Forum: Mysteries
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
Hi Jim, I recall you posting about the rock before. It certainly appears to be an anomaly, and I wouldnt be surprised if it was deposited by a Tsunami. Jonny
Forum: Mysteries
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
Hi Mike, There is no doubt that tsunami can indeed move large stones and boulders inland. The evidence for such movements are well documented. However, there is a growing body of work that is now questioning the role of large storms on boulder deposition. See here and here (with synopsis here example These papers tend to deal with coast lines that are on open oceans, where storms and
Forum: Mysteries
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
Unfortunately, in order to see their interpretations you would have to obtain a copy of their book. Being published as a "monograph" they were able to circumvent the peer review process, and to my knowledge, none of their hypothesis has appeared in peer review articles. I have a copy of the book, and if I find time later I will try to hunt out what they say regarding trajectory and
Forum: Mysteries
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
The trouble with the posited Sumerian record of an impact event at the Kofel's site is that radiocarbon dating of the Kofels land slide place it far older than the Sumerian civilisation period, by four millennia. Using radiocarbon wiggle matching of 6 radiocarbon dates, the landslide has been dated to 9527–9498 cal BP (or 7577-7548 BC counting a year zero!). Jonny
Forum: Mysteries
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
The previous post provided a link to a paper which discusses how the Smiley Faces exercise can instruct researchers on how to plan and conduct a good clinical trial. The following is a link to the second paper which outlines the results of many Smiley Face exercises. Inconsistencies in the drawing and interpretation of smiley faces: an observational study QuoteResults We collected 723
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
There is one more thing to point out about the orbital resonance between Venus and Earth, namely that it is NOT a proper resonance, but rather a near resonance. So I have stated quite a bit above about the 5:8 orbital resonance between Venus and Earth. I was remiss in defining what this actually refered to. It refers to the apparent ratio of Synodic Periods of Venus to the number of orbits E
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
It would indeed, typically more than a few thousand years I would imagine (maybe more like millions of years), and certainly not by a couple of close encounters. Jonny
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
Hi Paul, You make a very valid point, and one I wish to expand upopn. The so called rotational resonance is not exact (a pseudo-resonance?). For those that do not know, the resonance is observed by the fact that 5 Solar days (not sidereal days) on Venus is ALMOST equal to the mean synodic period of Venus with respect to Earth. So for those that want to play with the numbers. A solar day i
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
After posting yesterday I realised that there is an error in the argument that I was presenting regarding the rotational resonance of Venus and Earth. I knew that Venus apparently presents the same face to earth at each inferior conjunction with Earth, but that doesn’t mean that Earth does the same. So the argument that I was using that the rotational resonance being reset by a close approach o
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
Hi Kristin This is of course one of the issues with the whole close approach scenario. The burning question of course is "how close is close". I vaguely recall that the claim was that either Venus and/or mars came close enough to exchange atmospheres. That would be pretty damn and absurdly close, implying that the distance between surfaces is around 1000km. I am not even going to
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
Hi Ivano, lets look at the 4th conjecture on that list "If Venus made a close approach to the Earth, we may see rotational resonance with the Earth. " Let’s look at the idea that Venus has a near rotational resonance with the earth, and that this resonance was set up due to a close passage of Venus with the Earth. Note, there is an 5:8 orbital resonance between Venus and Earth, a
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
Please continue discussion here Jonny
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
The previous thread was getting rather unweildy, so I thought I would open up a part 2 here, and close the previous thread. Please continue discussion below. Mod Edit: I have edited the subject title my post to reflect the general topic being discussed below. Jonny
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
Hi Ian, The full paper for Bronk Ramsey et al. (2010) can be found here Jonny
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
A good bottle of spirit at 40% Vol or 80% proof is liquid down to -27 C. A 50% Vol or 100% proof is good down to around -40 C. Though if the weather reaches near to freezing point, I do not recommend drinking straight from the bottle! Jonny
Forum: Misc.
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
I have two folders, inbox and sent. I currently have 21 messages in total, but i dont have a percentage usage displayed, nor how many more messages that I can Store. I may not be the best example though having moderator status as being a mod might give extra space. Jonny
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
I must be special as I have 15 in mine at the moment :) Jonny
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
I wouldnt know, I dont use them :P Though I did hear that space was limited. Jonny
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
When sending PM's if you want a copy in your sent box you have to tick the small box that says "send copy to my inbox". Or something to that effect. I often find that it is easier just to send an email through the registered address, since the forum system does not generate an alert to let you know you have a PM waiting, and I often dont notice when the little envelope box beside &quo
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
If you look at the picture at the end of this document you can see what is meant by in-situ . The caption for it is "Pumice section on Santorini (Thera) showing the location of the olive branch (lowermost hole) and the presumed position of the tree (ghosted)." Jonny
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
Hi Kristin, I think you are confusing the two lines of evidence, or perhaps I have been a little misleading with a lack of clarity. The olive branch that is at the heart of the debate is a sample found on the island of Santorini (the Island that once was Thera), and was presumably killed and buried in-situ by the ash from the eruption. It, as far as I am aware, has not been dendrochemical
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
I am hoping that the paper referees feel exactly the same :) Jonny
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
LOL, trust me, I think you can. It is now no longer as exciting as the first draft I think you seen :P JOnny
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
Hi Ivano, I will not forget you at all should the pieces of research above get published. Yes there was an avenue of research that suggested that Thera could have erupted in the 1650's much earlier than believed from radiocarbon dates. This date was suggested due to the publication of an Anatloian tree ring chronology constructed from different sites across Anatolia. In one site-chronolog
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
57. Thera
Hi Ian, As you will likely know then, there is a great controversy over the dating of Thera with archaeologists preferring a mid to late 16th century date based upon archaeological evidences, and the physical sciences preferring a late 17th century date as per radiocarbon evidence. The interested reader can read some of the debate summarised in these two articles Cheribini et al 2014 and Man
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
Thanks Laird, Regarding van Geel et al, first your second quote does not seem to appear in this paper, so I presume it is from Morris. If so, then Morris does not appear to understand much abut radiocarbon calibration, such that the IntCal radiocarbon curve works for globally, and you do not need local trtees to calibrate dates. That is to say, if you look at the different data sets from Ge
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
Your welcome. You know I am a sucker for this stuff :P Jonny
Forum: Science & Space
1 year ago
JonnyMcA
Yes Hekla 3 is way too old to be this acid peak. But looking in Sigl et al. (2015) figure 2 (here ), we see that there is a northern hemisphere signal at 246 BC and a southern hemisphere signal in 248 BC. Now these could be the same signal or they could be two different volcanoes. However, if we look at other eruptions, we can see that in the northern NEEM core we have eruptions at 426, 246, 1
Forum: Science & Space
Current Page: 2 of 245