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For the discussion of general and orthodox history from the advent of writing up to mid 20th Century, i.e. 3,200BC up to World War II. 
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14 years ago
AndyBlackard
?? Thanks, but I was referring to figs :))
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
I've never heard that. Do you have any links where I can find more information? BTW, cotton is another mystery diffusion plant.
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
Thanks. Very interesting. Do you believe the Peru is Atlantis theory?
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
Here's a great white paper. Thanks for bringing this up. If Aspero really was a maritime settlement as he claims then that offers evidence for the trans-Pacific migration theory. This paper shows radio carbon dates back to 5330bce.
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
I think the newspapers are loose about what they call a city. However, in archeology a "city" is any human settlement with 10,000 or more people. No massive architecture is required.
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
"How and why did people start using a trade language as their primary language? " Fascinating question. Apparently the same thing happened to the Irish. The College of Dublin announced last fall that the Irish are not related to the Celtic tribes even though they ended up speaking a Celtic dialect. Their originaly language must have been Basque. The ancient lines of western Ireland (y
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
I am confused. Don't the legends imply that the island in Lake Titicaca was the first place populated? I checked my notes and the following is the only laboratory dates that I have found. But these dates don't seem to match any of the dates that I frequently hear discussed for Tiahuanaco. Any ideas? "By carbon-dating pottery shards and other finds, however, the researchers were able to det
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
thanks sounds like mostly speculation at this point
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
Thanks. Great article. Also a recent study of Basque burials from 3000-2000bce show a significant about of mtDNA haplogroup X. Curiously it is no longer in the modern Basque population. You are right that genetic genealogy cannot prove that the Israelites were never in America in ancient times. However, it does prove that they have no descendents among living Native Americans. It will be very
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
If the analysis is correct that one of the accounts of Atlantis refers to elephants and coconuts, then I think I have a differerent angle. Elephants and coconuts did not exist together anywhere in the Carribean, Atlantic or Mediterranean as far as I can tell in ancient times. Very very recently genetics have proven that the coconut originated on the west coast of South America. It is a little-
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
Have you seen the images? I'm not convinced by them. I only see what could just as well be a rocky ridgeline.
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
Am I correct that there has never been an analyitical dating of this site, only conjecture?
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
This is my favorite chart and shows the world-wide distribution or male DNA lineages (y-DNA) and female (mtDNA)
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
Please take a look at this great site. However, there are some errors. The types are depicted correctly but as Stephanie expained on another thread, the migration paths shown depict the outdated and incorrect beringia-clovis migration theory. "Who's DNA did they compare the American Indian to, out of curiosity? " Because of the invasions and mixing they have to look at the maternal
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
Hi Stephanie, I have not studied this subject. Can you comment on the following discovery made last summer and whether it has any connection with the formation of the Andes? thx
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
I have been heavily into genetic genealogy for the last several years especially with respect to the Native Americans and what the excommunicated man says is true. Nothing in the genetic makeup of Native Americans could have come from Israelites. They are from completely different genetic lines. Once you study it, it is as staightforward as the idea that two kangaroos cannot have a baby penguin
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
Hi, I am confused what "chamber" he is referring to. Do you know?
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
My readings indicated that this claim was untrue. What I found indicated that the Mayan 260-day sacred calendar came long before either the 360 or 365-day calendars and it continued to be used even after those were added. Mayan personal names are derived from the sacred 260-day calendar which came first. 365 cycles of the 260-day calendar yields the 52-year sun cycle. Later they developed a 3
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
I believe this theory comes from Velikovski. I don't feel it has any validity and his science and historical research were very flawed. There doesn't seem to be any significant events actually in 864 BC to support this theory. His revisionist theory of the development of the calendar is complete fiction. Additionally, he once claimed that Mars was a comet that passed by the earth and turned int
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
Cool. This is presumably long before the Phoenicians started coming to Cornwall for tin. Do they have any idea what the copper/bronze was used for? Trade or domestic use?
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
I agree. If we examine the story-telling methods of the surviving middle-eastern bards then you are spot on. The minute details were improvised and it was the object of the story that really mattered. Also different bards had their own styles of embelishments to make the story-telling enjoyable. I once took a meditation seminar with a Buddist nun who was perhaps the most-profound person I've ev
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
I got that information from "Mythology of the Ancient Near East" from The Teaching Company audio college lecture series. I had never heard this before, but the story of Sargon and the reed basket was apparently a "worldwide" best-seller. They have found translations in Hittite and an actual cuniform version in Akhenaten's capital city of Amarna, Egypt. This is significant t
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
Thanks, I see your point. I found this in my notes. "Researchers studied Native Americans from the Navajo, Chamorro and Flathead tribes. They then determined that all three groups possess a unique type of retrovirus gene, JCV, found only in China and Japan (National Academy of Sciences). Would seem to suggest travel by boat." My gr-grandmother was from the Catawba tribe of NC.
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
Stephanie, I sat down one day thinking I would list all of the chronological errors in the exodus/settlement of Canaan account. The "end was listless" and I finally gave up. Try this one for example: Exodus, estimated at 1446-1406bce, was said to have been in the reign of Ramses the great. However, his wasn't even born and his reign didn't start until 1290 B.C. And the great famin
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
Hmmmm. I don't recall any of the myths actually saying "global." I think most refer to "the world." But let's consider what "the world" was from the perspective of these ancient writers. I don't think they were necessarily including New Jersey and Sasketchewan, for example. They would not know of such places. I think "the world" to those people reach
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
" Re: Cro Magnon Man: 8000 B.C.? Author: Marduk (62.253.96.---) Date: 02-Aug-05 03:03 why multi cultural. thats not my understanding are you adding this emphasis from the figurines and heads attributed to the olmec. the shang and the mande ?" Yes because of the statues. I was thinking shang and black-skinned aboriginals and possibly also indians. They heavily influenced the Mayans
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
"The ancient Sun worshippers of the south-central U.S. came-up from Olmec land circa 1500 B.C." Do you have a link on that? I have not found where the Olmec went after their decline. They appear to have been a multi-racial culture and that doesn't seem to occur anywhere else in Central America.
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
Doh! You are right. I meant to type 120kya. In engineering we use "m" for thousands and I got crossed up. Let me use my notes this time and try to redeem myself: First known Neanderthal man left Africa up to 8,000,000 years ago (8mya) First premodern man (Homo ergasters) left Africa 1,900,000 years ago (1.9mya) This most-recent fossil find that indicates modern homo sapiens bac
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
Sorry for the jargon. I'm used to kya for thousands of years ago in sci journals. You are right; that is inconsistent.
Forum: Mysteries
14 years ago
AndyBlackard
G.V., I think we may have jumped the tracks. True, the traditional dating of "Cro-magnon Man" is roughly 40kya to 10kya (8000bce). However, to the best of my understanding, Cro-magnon Man is no longer considered a stopping point in the development of modern humans. Cro-Magnon man was anatomically identical to modern humans! It is an obsolete biological term, but it seems to be used t
Forum: Mysteries
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