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For serious discussion of the controversies, approaches and enigmas surrounding the origins and development of the human species and of human civilization. (NB: for more ‘out there’ posts we point you in the direction of the ‘Paranormal & Supernatural’ Message Board). 
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11 years ago
Me
This brings to mind the effect my grandfather's experience with malaria, and the effects it has had on his son, suffering sweating bouts forty years later.
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11 years ago
Me
I was about to make that reference myself. I think Wilson suggested that human behaviour shifted from a more instinctive intuitive form to our modern logical egocentric form. around 2500 years ago. I couldn't see any evidence for this though.
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Me
So we are considering that anthropomorphic deities came about as a side effect of larger communities? Making Roma, the archetypal example of a god or goddess? An expression of the community, all-powerful yet exclusive to the group?
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Me
Must admit I have been looking forward to this AOM. To start the ball rolling I'm inclined to ponder what actual limitations there would have been on hunter gatherer societies during the last ice age. Their lifestyle would have given them ample spare time. Did they spend it all on leisure or was there a body of knowledge developed? Most hunter-gatherers would live on the move, so a great librar
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Me
Having read Cotterell's Mayan Prophesy, I can agree that his acceptance of dodgy sources did make me cringe by the end. Referring to Edgar Cayce's dreams for evidence is not a good sign. A really bad sign though is claiming proof for the end of the world, then failing to provide a shred of evidence for it.
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11 years ago
Me
Patrick Geryl wrote: > I reiterate what I found. I have ABSOLUTE proof of the > following findings... > > > 1. A part of the Dresden Codex concerns the sunspot cycle > theory from Maurice Cotterell > > > 2. The theory from Maurice Cotterell is correct but he made > several faults in the interpretation > > > 3. I corrected these faults in my book The W
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11 years ago
Me
Please consider Laird that having someone dsperate to disprove your premise, failing and resorting to low tactics is a major vindication.
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11 years ago
Me
Reading the above it ocurred to me that with the mass transit of people from the third world into the first, how do the Dogon measure in this respect? Are there Dogon communities outside Africa?
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11 years ago
Me
I meant that the traffic of concepts would continue over time allowing concepts to develop between like-minded schools of thought. This would require some means of detailed message transmission though, or possibly acolytes from some regions periodically visiting their foreign counterparts to interact and exchange ideas. If people could trade beads over hundreds of miles they should be able to cir
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Me
This process could be described in terms of telepathy of the Jungian collective unconscious type. Personally I would favour the mixing of ideas via third hand contact between peoples. This information would have limited use for martial purposes, but might be shared between elite scholars.
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Me
Now that's what I call an interesting link. Thanks Deep, I was feeling rough when I started on that. A bit more calm has entered after contemplating this material. This seems relevant to the Dogon, of course the Buddha was a Hindu so this is not a separate source. Creation accounts in the Vedas speak of a cosmic egg or embryo from which " the lord of creation" was born as the great o
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Me
I'm inclined to note how popularisation usually leads to simplification, cutting corners and the literalisation of metaphor. The meaning and implications of the protected knowledge would be in greater danger of being lost, or more precisely corrupted had it been part of a universal system than an elite one.
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Me
MichaelHP is a qualified scientist? I missed that point. If so, why have no arguments or points of debate been exchanged on this thread? A counter argument is the simplest, easiest way to wreck an opposing opinion, so why has this been a "YOU'RE WRONG!!!" sort of thread?
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Me
I would like to submit that this thread has been a long list of unsubstantiated slanders to a generous, patient and polite AOM. No debate is occuring here, only a series of "oh no it isn'ts" and name calling. Is this a thread to pull?
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Me
This is a forum, a place of debate and discussion. You have offered no arguments only a straight refutation without basis for Laird's work. Then you have declared yoursef above the forum and departed. Technically this is nearer heckling than any form of debate. I could state here and now that your statements are meaningless, give no reasons why or evidence of expertise in the subject concerned,
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Me
One possible reason could be to avoid simplification and confusion between the actual state and the analogies necessary to explain them. Otherwise stories like the good Samaritan are taken as examples of what great individuals Samaritans are. A certain amount of concentration is required to understand the concepts involved. As for hiding things in plain view I find it very common in literature
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Me
MichaelHP wrote: > > I'm not going to debate anything here with you. You don't > appear to have sufficiently researched these topics to engage > in such a debate, anyway. > > Good evening. So your purpose here was to abuse? Making a statement which you refuse to back up or debate is a classic tactic for an indefensible position. I'm used to it on lighter topics but it has
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Me
I'm wondering. What if you had a series of coastal communities of a few hundred, maybe thousand. Populations are pretty low globally, reducing a primary cause of conflict as there is plenty of everything. There again they don't have to be non-aggressive. These cultures do not harness fossil fuels. But that would not stop them from developing highly complex mathematical systems, or geometry, or as
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Me
With regard to coastal land, I read that when Sundaland became the modern island groups they are now the overall land area diminished, but the amount of coastal land increased with all the new islands that were created. The link was interesting. I imagine something like a family organisation. Some would have dominant leaders, others might be more egalitarian. My central thought is how far a gr
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11 years ago
Me
Buck 45 wrote: > > Now about these ice age coasts. There was less coast and land > available to them. Maybe then those cultures/civs were more > like the early Greek city states and maybe there weren't that > many of them? How much of an footprint would/could they leave > if they weren't green 'tree-huggers?' : ) > > Thomas Tricky. Stone built structures would leav
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Me
Perhaps we should start defining what could have been by seeing what can be ruled out. I understand the ice cores from the ice age periods do not show evidence of a modern industrial culture pouring smoke and other pollution into the atmosphere. A petroleum based industry seems unlikely in the extreme partly for this and partly for how quickly we have consumed it. If an earlier culture used the i
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Me
The Elim wrote: > map of gobal temps in the worst years of late ice age. > Hopefully these links will be clickable, but with me and computers you never know.
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11 years ago
Me
Mant physicists speak of time as possibly non-existant. I wonder if we ourselves are more a part of time, or time is what we create from our consciousness causing (or even being) a long series of wave collapses. This brings up questions of how far does the consciousness stray from the body? And what of the unconscious mind, which seems to be the greater part? Reading through the Copenhagen int
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11 years ago
Me
Does there need to be a reason? Is that a holdover from Christian thinking? Why not a stream of consciousness' endlessly moving from one random experience to another? Life on Earth does seem to grow more intelligent as it evolves, although the smartest are not the automatic survivors. The Troodon was supposed to be the smartest thing in the late Cretacious, mammals caught up later.
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11 years ago
Me
I think we need a more simple question: What are we? Are we a physical shell with delusions according to materialism? Or Something with a purpose which inhabits this form as some religions claim? Or is it more complex. Are we a pattern rather than a collection of matter? Or a perspective?
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Me
I think Evolution in its simplest definition: that over great periods of time life mutates into new forms according to circumstance, is a key discovery and also an important yardstick for science. We cannot replicate it in the lab due to time constaraints but the evidence for the process screams at us from the fossil record (no not Val Doonican the calcified remains) and DNA studies that it is so
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11 years ago
Me
What is meant here is how many dogs or rats can recognise themselves in a mirror or video image?
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11 years ago
Me
I agree with that Warwick. True detatchment and open-mindedness are not possible. The greatest trap is to become convinced that as an individual you are without bias. If I listen as an agnostic to a Catholic and and a materialist go at it hammer and tongs, I get the feeling that both are arguing for their personal faith, but the more rational one is he who recognises that it is faith rather than
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11 years ago
Me
The head might certainly show the work of a skilled craftsman. But I don't see the need for modern tech when low tech ingenuity and patience can be brought to bear.
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11 years ago
Me
I would use the term paranormal in favour of supernatural. Supernatural being more of the Roman concept of something outside of nature and natural laws. The AEs worldview seems more like an Eastern or shamanic one with natural forces becoming personified into gods with powers and limitations.
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