Mysteries :  The Official GrahamHancock.com forums
For serious discussion of the controversies, approaches and enigmas surrounding the origins and development of the human species and of human civilization. (NB: for more ‘out there’ posts we point you in the direction of the ‘Paranormal & Supernatural’ Message Board). 
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8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
With regard to your comment: "There are numerous reasons people would want water. It is the source of life", I had always assumed - perhaps naively - that the River Nile provided sufficient water for drinking, cooking and the irrigation of crops. Isn't this what sustained the development of an Ancient civilisation? If this is the case, why build an elaborate "water pump" whe
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
I ask this question in ignorance but sincerely: Are the pyramids which are known to have been built earlier than the Great Pyramid adorned with decoartive reliefs, like those known to have been built after the GP? If not, then one could argue that decoration was simply a stylistic evolution. Equally, if earlier pyramids are adorned with decorative reliefs then one must also ask: why are they
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
The ancient Egyptians had no idea about astronomy? Is this for real? The tables of stars on the ceiling of the tombs of pharaohs Rameses VI and Rameses IX convey indisputable proof that for fixing the hours of the night, a man seated on the ground faced the Astrologer in such a position that the line of observation of the pole star passed over the middle of his head. On the different days of th
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
Ignore that post; I realise now that the ouroborus came to be depicted as a dragon as well as a serpent in the middle ages, making the Atalanta Fugiens illustration most certainly an ouroborus.
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
An interesting hypothesis. Have you noted that the Ouroborus is depicted in one of the plates of the Atalanta Fugiens? It appears as a dragon rather than a snake, though. Is this artistic license or should it be discounted?
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
For what it's worth, here is what I've just read and in so doing, answered my own question about solstice worship: "The resemblance of the trilithon (The Burden of Maui) with Stonehenge is often quoted but Stonehenge has many more pillars and the lintels are on top of the sarsens, and not sunken down in a slit. Stonehenge may have been an archaeoastronomical observatory, as claimed by Geral
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
I thought that Tamanui-te-ra is more commonly referred to as Tamanui-te-roua though both are acceptable spellings. I'm off to check out the 'Burden of Maui' to detrmine why you think there may be some truth to the myth! Interestingly, the sun god had two wives: his summer maiden and his winter maiden. Might this be connected to an understanding and an observation of solstices? I ask in earnest
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
A Neo-Assyrian text from the 7th century BC purporting to be Sargon of Akkad's autobiography asserts that the great king was the illegitimate son of a priestess. In the Neo-Assyrian account Sargon's birth and his early childhood are described thus: "My mother was a high priestess, my father I knew not. The brothers of my father loved the hills. My city is Azupiranu, which is situated on th
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
Are you familiar with the Yazilikaya Platform of Midas City, located in Turkey? It boasts a decorative "doorway" which reminds me of the Peruvian structure you enquired about. I know nothing of an Eygptian looking figure having been removed from Amaru Muru though :)
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
Hi Grits One suspects that a civilisation whose feats of engineering included the deliberate optical event of an undulating serpent into the design of a huge pyramid to mark the equnoxes - the 'epiphany of the Feathered Serpent' -did not "accidentally" create the acoustic feature to which you refer at the Great Ball Court. The pyramid of Kukulcan has an inner chamber containing a ston
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
Interestingly, the Christian belief in resurrection of the Christ: "On the third day he rose from the Dead" (The Nicene Creed) perhaps evolved or was an assimilation of older, Ancient Egyptian belief that the body of Osiris was restored to life after 3 days. The period between Osiris' death and resurrection varies, depending on the myth. For example, as "the Osiris"/deceased
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
Hi Don I have no comment to make with reference to your first question; much has been debated about whether several of the world's temple complexes around the world are ground maps of constellations. In fact, Graham Hancock wrote on this in his work, "Heavens Mirror" which synthesises some of the ideas he presents elsewhere in more detail in Fingerprints of the Gods and The Keeper of G
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
The fertility goddess Anqet is depicted in relief as holding an ankh, as is Tefnut who was depicted in fully human and leonine form, though in leonine form she can be distinguished from Sekhmet because Tefnut's ears are pointed while Sekhmet's are rounded. Most ancient Egyptian gods and goddesses have subsequently been associated and depicted with the ankh but I'm interpreting your question as m
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
Also, Wepwawet ("Opener of the Way") - a deity associated with war and death - famously carries the ankh. Check out the Ikhernofret stela (I-Kher-Nefert) erected in the 12th dynasty at Abydos. The stela contains much of the extant information about the "Passion of Osiris". The Stela of I-Kher-Nefert recounts the programme of events of the public elements during a five day fe
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
Horus and Ra, obviously; but Kneph and the goddess Hathor are also shown holding the ankh to the nose of Queen Mutemwia, mother of Amenhotep III, in the controversial "Divine Birth" relief at the temple of Amun at Luxor.
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
You are most welcome :)
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
According to an interpretation of the Ikhernofret Stela (circa 1850 BC) by Richard H. Wilkinson, Regents Professor of Egyptian Archaeology at the University of Arizona and Director of the University of Arizona Egyptian Expedition, Osiris' death and resurrection was celebrated in a 5 day festival known as the "Passion Plays." Osiris is entombed on the second day and remains so until the
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
Another citation to support the idea of the resurrection of Osiris after 3 days: According to an interpretation of the Ikhernofret Stela (circa 1850 BC) by Richard H. Wilkinson, Regents Professor of Egyptian Archaeology at the University of Arizona and Director of the University of Arizona Egyptian Expedition, Osiris' death and resurrection was celebrated in a 5 day festival known as the "P
Forum: Mysteries
8 years ago
eyeofhorus33
It is my understanding that the period between Osiris' death and resurrection varies, depending on the myth. For example, as "the Osiris"/deceased in the Egyptian funerary texts, as well as the nightly sun, he dies and is resurrected on a daily basis. The annual death-and-resurrection period, however, is commonly depicted as three days. One such citation is Reverend Dr. Alfred Berthol
Forum: Mysteries
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