Mysteries :  The Official GrahamHancock.com forums
For serious discussion of the controversies, approaches and enigmas surrounding the origins and development of the human species and of human civilization. (NB: for more ‘out there’ posts we point you in the direction of the ‘Paranormal & Supernatural’ Message Board). 
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1 year ago
Skatha
Rivers are in a state of perpetual change, like the landscape. There are no cycles because each season brings something new (different amounts of rain, for instance, landscape shifting because of earthquakes (they have them near Cairo).)
Forum: Mysteries
1 year ago
Skatha
EzeqeelNOCH Wrote: ------------------------------------------------------- > Documenting the Nile's original distance from the > Giza pyramids is truly difficult Not really. They built a harbor at the foot of the plateau and there are channels to bring the boats carrying stone from Aswan and other places dug right near the pyramid. So the answer is "very close during the rainy
Forum: Mysteries
1 year ago
Skatha
It depends on if you're driving or if you're measuring the landscape. It's 5+ miles if you drive, as I remember. The road curves around.
Forum: Mysteries
1 year ago
Skatha
It's less than 4 miles from the Nile. Look it up on the maps. I don't know where you got 13 miles from, but it's not correct. If you look at old photos, you can tell the Nile has always been close to the pyramids.
Forum: Mysteries
2 years ago
Skatha
No, and it's not even close. I've been there. It's a relatively small area. It's similar to mound builder sites and other similar cultural sites, including the Caddoan culture.
Forum: Mysteries
2 years ago
Skatha
Well (as you may note from your time spent searching stuff for your PhD), there's a lot of things that do not get documented because they're trivial for that time and culture. Back then, when they were hunting up ancient ruins, they did document finds that they thought were significant. The fact that it's been in the area (and has been known and examined by others) but is NOT documented indic
Forum: Mysteries
2 years ago
Skatha
There's no evidence that Edomites went to sea or were good sailors.
Forum: History
2 years ago
Skatha
However, if we humans had been through multiple population collapses, it would show clearly in the DNA. (see Toba Catastrophe Theory: ) The evidence doesn't show multiple collapses.
Forum: History
2 years ago
Skatha
loveritas wrote: > You stated from your favourite source : > > "Yes, indeed. However, in the time period we're discussing, > Egypt had TWO vizirs -- the Vizir of the North and the Vizir of > the South." > > Which time period would that be? I do not recall any specific > time period or the dual position of Grand Vizier being > mentioned in the Bible. The B
Forum: History
2 years ago
Skatha
loveritas wrote: > Hi Skatha, > > You stated, regarding the term "Grand Vizier" : > > "No, at least not in the Bible. In some of the legends > written later, yes, he's described that way. But not in > anything in the bible." > > According to your favourite reference source the term "Grand > Vizier" is explained thus : > > &quo
Forum: History
2 years ago
Skatha
11. Re: No
eli stills wrote: > In your remarks you do not consider or choose not to address > the possibility that the Hebrew literature I am referencing > provides for an epoch of time and humanoid habitation prior to > the creation of Adam. > Actually, I did. In the biblical/christian/Hebrew literature, Adam was the first man and no others were created before him. No other type of peop
Forum: History
2 years ago
Skatha
12. Re: No
The answer is still 'no'. > 4:26 And to Seth, to him also there was born a son; and he > called his name Enos: then began men to call themselves by the > name of the LORD. KJV > > I am posing the question if one applies this translation to the > historical records it could be taken to infer that the > descendent ants of Adam (whom in this scenario I equate homo > sapiens
Forum: History
2 years ago
Skatha
13. No
Agriculture doesn't develop until long after the last Neanderthal died. I'm not sure which of Adam's sons you're trying to equate with Neanderthals and which with H. sap, but it doesn't work. The earliest evidence of agriculture appears around the end of the last ice age, some 12,000 years ago. Neanderthals had shuffled off the mortal coil 20,000 years before that.
Forum: History
2 years ago
Skatha
thirdpal wrote: > Did anyone see the History Channel documentary called Exodus > Decoded a few years back? A journalist presented the facts and > speculation that the pharaoh Ahmoses was the pharaoh of the > Exodus and the Israelites were the Hyksos. Ahmoses, in Hebrew, > means "brother of Moses". He found a ruin of a city in the Nile > delta called Avaris and several
Forum: History
2 years ago
Skatha
Aine wrote: > Well, the Hebrews didn't become truly monotheistic until after > the second captivity. That's a long, long time. And I'm > probably mixing things up here, but wasn't Joseph Jafar > Grand Vizier? No, at least not in the Bible. In some of the legends written later, yes, he's described that way. But not in anything in the bible. > > If the Exodus is true, then t
Forum: History
2 years ago
Skatha
DoctorStephenMaturinToday wrote: > Ward believes it is Hapu. Scott's candidate is Senenmut. The architect? That sounds awfully implausible. > He believes the actual adversarial Pharaoh to the > historical Moses (a.k.a. Senenmut) was Amenhotep II. That sounds even less plausible, since we know who his parents and siblings were, and there's a good deal written about him on va
Forum: History
2 years ago
Skatha
I've seen the area. If you had heavy horses with armor and fully armored Templars, they would have been stuck in the soggy moorland after a short trot. They'd hardly be leading charges.
Forum: History
3 years ago
Skatha
The remark about the clothing was from looking at other murals in the place. There were a few that I thought were similar in style to the ones you were showing.
Forum: History
3 years ago
Skatha
It says the artist is "anonymous" -- whoever it is, the colors and technique are not Leonardo nor are they Michaelangelo. The artist was very professional and had excellent technique, but the style is decidedly different. That said, there are multiple artists who did the frescoes over a period of time. I don't have access to the publication on the murals, but I've looked at images an
Forum: History
3 years ago
Skatha
Those aren't Leonardo's paintings -- the unicorn's wrong for Leonardo. Here's how he did Adam and Eve:
Forum: History
3 years ago
Skatha
They knew the world was round at that point, and did have maps. WND, as others said, is a tabloid and not reliable.
Forum: History
3 years ago
Skatha
Depends on which Roman army and which commander. The Roman army of 200 BC wasn't much to talk about. Under Caesar or the other great commanders, yes.
Forum: History
3 years ago
Skatha
Robert the Bruce had several things going for him -- good strategy, good command of the field, and the Highland Scots with the "highland charge." For this maneuver, they would shout out "Claymores!" and the whole line would rush their foes, screaming and waving the heavy swords. It was a basic 'shock troops' tactic, and they could get through a line of musketry pretty effe
Forum: History
3 years ago
Skatha
What do the hieroglyphs on the wall (which are not shown in this picture) say? Is this part of his "Battle of Kadesh" inscription?
Forum: History
3 years ago
Skatha
Didn't you translate it before this and come up with an entirely different translation?
Forum: History
3 years ago
Skatha
Greece does have a legitimate claim on them, yes, but the problem of ownership is a difficult one. This kind of decision is something that's still being hammered out on a global scale. In many cases, the locals were eager to exchange what was worthless bits of antiquity to foreigners for money that they desperately needed. In some cases the antiquities were simply looted or were bought through
Forum: History
3 years ago
Skatha
I'll look him up, too. Never heard of him before. (sigh) It's depressing how little I know about the world.
Forum: History
3 years ago
Skatha
Thanks! Many useful things in there!
Forum: History
3 years ago
Skatha
They're the same. Someone just flipped the photo.
Forum: History
3 years ago
Skatha
No. That looks more like a Shen Ring than an Ankh. Sumerians date to 2900 BC, and the ankh was in use long before that.
Forum: History
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