Mysteries :  The Official GrahamHancock.com forums
For serious discussion of the controversies, approaches and enigmas surrounding the origins and development of the human species and of human civilization. (NB: for more ‘out there’ posts we point you in the direction of the ‘Paranormal & Supernatural’ Message Board). 
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16 years ago
DPCrisp
The good news is that you CAN get a plus sign (%2b) to appear in the body of a message, afterall. The bad news is that it's clunky and inelegant: type % 2 B The irritating thing is that the Subject for the message does accept %2b's in the normal way. And so does the emailed version of the post. Maybe we should just live with ampersands (&) instead... or have them get the Message Board sof
Forum: Global Village
16 years ago
DPCrisp
...I'd Really Love To See You Tonight Think of a characteristic phrase that you're sure of do a search in Google, etc. ;-)
Forum: Global Village
17 years ago
DPCrisp
Thanx, but I tried that already - and failed. (Trouble with the website.) It's "pre-order, just in case it comes up" anyway - far from a guarantee of success. I might try it again. DPC
Forum: Global Village
17 years ago
DPCrisp
Help! Relativity, Time and Reality A critical investigation of the Einstein theory of relativity from a logical point of view Harald Nordenson ISBN 004192021X Allen & Unwin 1969 I read this book at university, but haven't been able to get it for myself. (They have two copies, but won't sell me one!) I've tried book finding services and the Internet to no avail. I don't suppose anyone can l
Forum: Global Village
17 years ago
DPCrisp
I'm no expert, but I know dragons vary widely from place to place and time to time. Chinese dragons are amalgamations of various animals, said to be tribal totems: snake/fish, goat, dog, deer... Years ago I heard that someone was being serious about the classic European dragon, as slain by knights of old. The story went : Dragons' bodies were highly acidic. Reacting acids with metals gives off
Forum: Global Village
14 years ago
DPCrisp
Plato's description is rather clear, complete and unambiguous. Read my essay on the Underworld page!
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
Thanx for reminding me of what I was talking about, Curious: some very interesting things are immediately apparent from a quick Google on Attica, Athena and Poseidon - well worth following up. (Poseidon the Tamer of Horses, Medusa, olive trees, a spring in the Acropolis, King Cecrops...) This mythical quarrel certainly seems as strong as argument for Atlantis as against it. Thanx for the book r
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
Hi everyone. Does anybody know all about the war fought between the Athenians and the Poseidonians? All I know is that Plato's account of Atlantis is sometimes dismissed as referring to this war. I'm not sure whether it's supposed to be wholly mythological (and therefore Plato has nothing real to say) or a known, historical war (and therefore Plato has nothing real to say). But what if it wer
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
Long time no posting from me, but I've just popped back in to say: read my essay! ;-)
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
I'll bet you're right, too, fisherman. Ost = aust = east Ost = bone, like an (ostrich) egg shell? Ostra = shell Ostium = door, opening, rivermouth, as in womb/bounty/fecundity. Ostentum (as in ostensible, ostentation) = something shown or branching out, as in ostium. There aren't many ost- words not related to one of these! Aust- words all seem to mean either east, bird or south. Now how
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
...is all the result of the influence of the Church on the educated in Britain? Then I'm still confused because: i) the Church deliberately kept Latin from the laity. If the priests had spent all day talking about household items in Latin, the parishioners would still have gleaned nothing. ii) the Roman strategy was to Romanise. Having brought the trappings of Roman daily life, they could not w
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
The 'C' word is English then, not Latin. Interesting. (How do you know the term was not anatomical before monumental?) What makes you think the Romans made a dirty word of it? My guess would be the Victorians, given i) the Victorians, ii) London, Oxford... had their Grope 'Kennet' Lanes, iii) Chaucer used the word a handful of times. Regarding the roads, what makes more sense: the British were
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
There's a book to accompany the original series, which is being shown (and reshown) in small snippets. The tone is excited and understandable: "we owe some great stuff to the Romans and their influence is full-on in our faces still". But it's easy to say the Romans brought us the words for olives, peppers and styluses...es and not go on to discuss how those influences reached us.
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
Did anyone see Adam Hart-Davis on telly the other night [again!] telling us how various foods, concepts, techniques and the words for them were brought by the Romans -- and they're still with us? He did not explain how the supposedly-then-indigenous Brythonic-speakers managed to take on these Latin words and later pass on only the words of Latin origin to the supposedly-Anglo-Saxon-later-English
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
The famous Half Dome Mountain in Yosemite, California was sculpted by glaciers. i) If it was sheared off in one go, there should be half a mountain lying in the valley somewhere. Is there one? ii) If it was worn away slowly, so there are no discernable chunks to be found, does anyone know whether the flowrate of ice needed to do this has ever been calculated? Dan.
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
Oxygen's energetic chemical reactions are a double-edged sword: we use the energy to function normally, but at the price of constantly countering the unwanted reactions. Life span may be to a large extent the time for which we can stave off permanent damage inside our cells. If there were more oxygen for the ancients to breathe (and there wasn't), they would have suffered for it.
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
Essan said: > Don't know about a glacial retreat exposing rock; most CO2 sequestering > in rock is in sedimentary rocks whereas most glaciation occurred in > upland areas comprised predominantly of igneous and metamorphic rocks. But we're talking about the height of glaciation, when lowland areas were covered. > One possibility for the increase in CO2 as the ice age ended is the &
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
The heat of the Sun is slowly increasing over the eons, which means the CO2 level in our atmosphere must decrease in the long run in order to maintain a comfortable temperature. In the short term, the atmosphere is pretty well in a steady state: CO2 is used to build organic matter by photosynthesizers, liberating O2, which is used by the consumers to turn the organic matter back into CO2. A small
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
They do like to say the dominant period in the Milankovitch cycle is 100,000 years, coinciding with the interglacials: summer warming due to the astronomical influences falling in phase being enough to cause the glaciers to retreat. But they don't like to say the highest peaks in insolation are immediately preceded and followed by the deepest troughs!
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
> OK forrest fires and volcanoes not to mention > methyl hydrate releases all contribute to the retreat of > glaciers, Umm... A glut of forest fires would tend to cause cooling by sequestering the C in non-decomposing charcoal and reducing atmospheric CO2. (Maybe that's one of the ways the abnormally warm interglacial periods are overcome?) Methane is a greenhouse gas, but also highly
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
No, it means everything comes from and returns to the Earth/earth.
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
...since we are equipped with specialised mechanisms for detecting symmetry, faces, etc., we have a finite field of vision and the stars are not equally bright, there must be some in-built tendency to identify groups of stars in some ways and not in others.
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
Thanx Guys. Allan said: > The 'Oceanic Conveyor' is certainly linked with climatic > variations but our understanding of the relationship is rather > limited at this point. You can say that again! > Exactly what triggered Younger Dryas is a real question because > it occurred so quickly after the initial warmup. If meltwater is the simple answer, then the real question is wha
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
The North Atlantic Conveyor (Gulf Stream) is supposed to work like this: Warm water from the Caribbean, being less dense, flows in a top current towards Europe, increasing in salinity due to evapouration on the way. When it gets cold enough, it's high density makes it sink and return southwards as a deep current. All this heat delivered to Western Europe gives us a much milder climate than the s
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
Serpents, dragons and snakes are not necessarily the same thing. Let's assume snakes are at the root of it, fascinating and iconic because: they have no legs, yet run fast, climb trees, go pot-holing they are forever in intimate contact with Mother Earth they lay eggs -- and eggs look like stone's yet life springs from them they swallow eggs whole they're deadly poisonous -- destroyers as well
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
Well, to be fair, Milankovitch must have been entirely right, in that he calculated the variations in solar radiation incident upon the northern and southern hemispheres with the periodic variations in Earth's axis and orbit. Anyone doing the maths will come up with the same 100,000 year cycle. The mistake is in finding some evidence of "Ice Ages" every 100,000 years and claiming that
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
It's public domain stuff, per Miner's post. Knowing the standard formula, I just cranked the handle and out popped the answer. Miner, %2b is strpped out as a special character. You need to type % 2 b wherever you want a %2b sign. Tedious, huh?
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
...you've got the reciprocal there, Lee: the solution for n = x²/(2x%2b1). The solution for n = (2x%2b1)/x² is x = (1±sqrt)/n.
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
Mediterranean means in the middle OF the land.
Forum: Mysteries
15 years ago
DPCrisp
> You can only have a "tenth" letter when you have an alphabet > since presumably the Chinese or the AE's don't count there > several thousand (?) glyphs in order. They must teach them in a given order, starting with the basics; but that's not the same thing. The alphabet has a particular order that seems to be no particular order. They're certainly not in order of usefulness:
Forum: Mysteries
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