Mysteries :  The Official GrahamHancock.com forums
For serious discussion of the controversies, approaches and enigmas surrounding the origins and development of the human species and of human civilization. (NB: for more ‘out there’ posts we point you in the direction of the ‘Paranormal & Supernatural’ Message Board). 
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8 years ago
Drewski
Pete Vanderzwet wrote: > Maybe they lined the criminals up in front of their first rank > and decapitated them. > That would make make more sense to my thinking. > Samurai used to label their swords in a ranking system > according to how many bodies it could cut through with a single > swing. A two body sword, a three body sword, even a five body > sword. Decapitation
Forum: History
8 years ago
Drewski
I also have to doubt this, mainly because of the forces involved. In medieval executions, when either a large two handed sword or similar two handed axe was employed, it was unfortunately common to take several attempts for the decapitation. This is where the executioner can take a full unimpeded swing. I just don't see how you can generate the force possible on your own neck, even with a sharp
Forum: History
7 years ago
Drewski
patrickchouinard74 wrote: > One of my earliest lectures and key topic in my book Forgotten > Worlds, are the Caucasian Mummies of China. > > My theory is that while many of the later Caucasian mummies > represent a definite European line, some older examples are > descended from a proto-Caucasoid race that existed there in > remote antiquity. > > > Post Edited
Forum: Author of the Month
7 years ago
Drewski
Thanks for the reply. Hmm...Like many here, I'm very familiar with the Grt Pyramid's internal schematic, and every time I look at it, some definitive purpose seems to present itself. Not one I've ever quite been able to put my finger on, but something almost machinelike (and no I'm not necessarily agreeing with Chris Dunn or others here). The Grand Gallery especially, is a completely illogica
Forum: Author of the Month
7 years ago
Drewski
Congrats on the book to begin with, sterling effort. While personally I'm quite open to the true purpose of the Giza Pyramids; imo the tomb hypothosis is still just that, it's unproven by all possible definitions; the RVT will also need more proof, which isn't to my mind going to be easy to find. However, I have one small question to start with, and apologies if it has been answered elsewhere:-
Forum: Author of the Month
7 years ago
Drewski
No, I actually meant that the OP had jumped the gun, and was just trying to explain how the topic seemingly came out of the blue as such :) Even though I haven't commented, I've followed your AOM discussions with interest, and can safely say you've been one of the most dedicated and prolific AOM in a long while. Good job!
Forum: Author of the Month
7 years ago
Drewski
I'm thinking the OP was intended for Scott and Gary, (next months' AOMs)..but someone jumped the gun by over a week ;) I'm sure they'll discuss the topic in due course.
Forum: Author of the Month
7 years ago
Drewski
Some very good points. Re that article, it really isn't useful science. The question researched was basically "how could sub-tropical (and tropical) fauna and flora thrive in a supposedly frigid climate?" Answer: they couldn't. Therefore prove it was much warmer than today; which they gave evidence for. Well as Kyle stated, that really isn't the point. Of course it was much warmer
Forum: Author of the Month
8 years ago
Drewski
Something that's always bothered me with this, is a bit of logic. Let's take Jericho, which is generally accepted to have had a defensive/other structure in 8000BC, with a 30ft tower and 18ft high, 5ft thick walls. That's quite an undertaking for a supposed lack of civilization. Now Jericho to Giza is about 265 miles (as the crow flies-yes that close), which is the distance from London to Newca
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
Drewski
Robert, Just dropping a note, to say thanks for our discussions earlier in the month. I have followed all of your post threads this month, and congratulate you for being so frank and honest. You have set a standard for future authors of the month. Hope you choose to frequent these forums in the future, Andy
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
Drewski
Archae, one last point on Baalbek then let's leave it ok? This is all from Deutsches Archaologisches Institut QuoteThe area of the modern town of Baalbek was first settled at the end of the 8th millennium BC. The tell preserved underneath the temple of Jupiter was almost continuously settled until the Hellenistic period.. QuoteIn 2004 and 2005, the north, east and south sections of the deep t
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
Drewski
The whole post was a parody of your style Archae, it had nothing to do with logical arguement, I was just stating "facts" in your way..... but I see I'm just beating my head against a metaphorical wall here.. I'll stop it's frutiless, look up the word "sarcasm". With one last thing I can't let go... QuoteNothing was found in the early work by the Germans a hundred years ago,
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
Drewski
Sigh...... You still don't get it do you Archae? I read the page and its mostly speculation (with the only real source quoted as that of a dig from over 100 yrs ago). If we are still relying on 100yrs old info, then lets all quote Petrie as being the absolute paragon of truth. Let me answer this in typical Solenhoffen style:- QuoteA German expedition dug 1904/1905 through to the foundations o
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
Drewski
Archae: Re The Romans and Baalbek, see here...to my mind, this sums up quite nicely all the candidates for "enough reasonable doubt"..... One point that cannot be stressed enough, is why build a base out of 300+ ton blocks, when you have concrete? And Lastly on a personal note, I know you are the greatest advocate of the status quo, and whatever is in the textbooks is unequivicable fa
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
Drewski
I wasn't being faecetious. I simply meant to show, that a "fairly recent" isolated civ, of which the Western world has written historical data (from Spanish records) held this view. If someone under torture, is still basically telling the tormentor "we have no idea who built these things, they have always been there as far as we know", then they are probably telling the truth.
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
Drewski
@Scott: Excellent reply! Actually, I remember reading a book a long while back, showing how accurate astronomical measurements could be made using just a plank of wood and a plumbline (with a huge amount of patience thrown in)......sorry the name of the specific book slips my mind at the moment...nice dedication to your theory, actually doing it in situ :) @Laird: You mean along the lines of:- e
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
Drewski
Scott, A question I've always wanted to ask you (and others) but never got around to... Let's say I accept your theory. Then the question I need answering, is how on Earth did the AEs obtain such accurate measurements for the Orion Belt Stars, with nothing more than the naked eye?
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
Drewski
Andy see this thread ...I asked same question about 2/3rds of way into thread (scroll till you see lots of pics)
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
Drewski
Thanks again Robert, Yes, even as I was finding some good pictures of the Sphinx's tail, the word "reconstruction" kept coming to mind...... Did you find other sources for the Roman Reconstruction ?, as to quote Dr Hawass (something I thought I'd never do in this lifetime).. QuotePhase III of the Sphinx Conservation: Roman period (30 BC-end 2nd century AD) The ancient sources attest
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
Drewski
Thanks for the reply, Robert: QuoteHello, Drewski, I have never participated in one of these before and as I only see a small square box in front of me in which to type, I was under the impression that it all had to be in one block! I will be delighted to do some spacing! These little text boxes can be quite versatile, if you want to insert images, or insert "clickable" links into yo
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
Drewski
Hi Robert, I absolutely hate to ask this of a published writer, but 50+ lines of unbroken text, is extremely difficult to follow on the net. Splendid ideas, excellent replies, but some spacing please :)
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
Drewski
Again, I agree with the idealism but In real life, matters aren't so clear cut. If Govts made say Cannabis legal, then anyone could buy it at a retail store. If the Govt started off adding 60% Tax, then that would be the market entry price. Whoever the manufacturers were, and whatever they charged for it, would be largely immaterial, as the vast cost of purchasing said substance would be the amou
Forum: Author of the Month
10 years ago
Drewski
As much as I agree with the sentiment of your article Graham, one point keeps coming back to me.. If The Govt legalised all drug use, they'd suddenly all cost probably twice as much. Look at the hideous amount they make at present in "duty" and VAT on Cigarettes and Alcohol. 20 Marlboro in the UK cost almost £6.00 at present. Which amounts to 80% Duty and VAT. 80%! That should be ille
Forum: Author of the Month
9 years ago
Drewski
Did Anyone have Italy ? ;)
Forum: Misc.
9 years ago
Drewski
Not quite right Pete...as long as England WIN their last group game, they advance whatever US do. If they both win, then it comes down to who has the better win goal difference. If both games are a draw, then England need to have a +2 better draw (e.g. 2-2 to say 0-0). It may even come down to drawing lots. See here for a pedantice breakdown of possibilities. Basically a win is certain advanceme
Forum: Misc.
8 years ago
Drewski
Lothur wrote: > It's best described as "normalcy bias". > > Things must be as they should be, and have always been, because > the alternative is to outlandish and horrible to be true. > > Millions have died and suffered for normalcy bias. That's probably as good a term as any. I was stuck to come up with one, as its so far outside the normal sphere of thought.
Forum: Gunpowder, Treason & Plot
8 years ago
Drewski
I don't post much in this particular forum, and tend to stick to the ancient history (mysteries) debates. Nevertheless, my interest got stimulated, and I have watched all the various for and against videos I could find, and tried to weigh up the evidence for myself. There are just too many slight (and larger) anomalous issues, that a new full independant (and I'd suggest NON-US) investigation i
Forum: Gunpowder, Treason & Plot
9 years ago
Drewski
Got to agree with Jal here...you can live for quite a long time without food, but no liquid (i.e. water) will kill you sooner than later. I went on a crash diet last year, went from around 220 - 185 pounds in 2 weeks. I ate nothing but fruit for that time. Didn't really need to lose that much weight, and it actually made me ill for a while (never ever been on a diet before)...now back to around
Forum: Paranormal & Supernatural
10 years ago
Drewski
Nah, its all Roland Emmerich. The guy has pretty much got a fixation with the end of the world. He roasted it in Independence Day, he froze it in The day after Tomorrow...when he saw all the 2012 hype, he must have been slavering all over potential screenplays...."I can roast it, freeze it, drown it, explode it...oh pls can I mummy, can I?" A blockbuster's longevity, is only really as
Forum: Paranormal & Supernatural
4 years ago
Drewski
Evil money making scheme at its worst. Buy more content for points, then we got you hooked, and whoever gives the most money wins the seat. A mutant version of `How to become President and be the best at World of Warcraft`, without having any talent for either ;)
Forum: Science & Space
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