Mysteries :  The Official GrahamHancock.com forums
For serious discussion of the controversies, approaches and enigmas surrounding the origins and development of the human species and of human civilization. (NB: for more ‘out there’ posts we point you in the direction of the ‘Paranormal & Supernatural’ Message Board). 
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6 years ago
Lugh
I love hist.fiction. One I particularily enjoyed was "The Labyrinth", by Kate Moss. Post Edited (23-Jan-13 09:20)
Forum: History
7 years ago
Lugh
Hi Huub I am of the opinion that ancient "art" is rarely just art (if ever) - like the symbols carved at megalithic monuments such as at the Boyne Valley Complex in Ireland, the great monuments in Brittany and elsewhere - especially if one finds the same symbols at distant places.... I do think that the Pictish symbols are indeed symbols of different meanings, astronomical as well as
Forum: History
7 years ago
Lugh
Archaeologists have unearthed rare Pictish burials in Perthshire, Scotland. I find them to be an extremely interesting bunch of folkies, who produced beautiful pieces of art and practisted matriliny at least amongst nobility/royalty. Interesting article on Pictish mDNA, history etc here:
Forum: History
7 years ago
Lugh
LOL!!! Good one, Eddie. On a more serious note: as an archaeologist, I find it quite exciting and I'm grateful that there are advanced methods to determine the whereabouts, for instance, of ancient remains, remember the Stonehenge Archer etc... Post Edited (20-Apr-12 08:36)
Forum: History
7 years ago
Lugh
Strictly speking, this was not really a battle, but it has always interested me from the aspect of humanity. Wounded Knee. One of the truly black hours of American History. One of many. "We were all wounded at Wounded Knee.... You and me... we were all wiped out by the 7th cavalry...." Here's the song performed by Redbone
Forum: History
7 years ago
Lugh
Battle of the Boyne, 1690 close to Drogheda, Co. Louth I have visited the battlefield in 1998 and was amazed how peaceful and calm the landscape looked. The battle was crucial for Ireland's fate and is still commemorated in the North by the Protestants, with marching through the streets of Belfast and Derry..("Remember 1690!") , thus rubbing it in every year, and provoking more viol
Forum: History
7 years ago
Lugh
Yesterday, it's been 70 years since the German Government decided on the great European Overkill at the Wannsee Conference. Seeing their grand-children's generation marching again is horrible. Will humankind ever be able to overcome fanatism, religious and racial differences and live together in mutual respect and in peace?
Forum: History
7 years ago
Lugh
I wish I could go there and have a look.... "Lux in Arcana" ..... oh, well. I have no doubts that the documents on display will be carefully chosen. What I'd like to have, is a key.
Forum: History
7 years ago
Lugh
I don't know..... I have come to the conclusion that this whole thing called "civilization" is highly overrated. Might be a shocking thing for an archaeologist to say so. Yes, we do look at Greece or Rome for instance, admire the monuments, the pieces of art they created, the invention of democracy, the roman law which became the basis for every law in the west, maybe some even admire t
Forum: History
11 years ago
Lugh
Hi Indy, As a fan of the Dune-novels: thank you for the info, I didn't know any of this. I love the art-work in the novels, but never bothered to check out the artist - will do so now! Thanks and cheers, Tatjana
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Lugh
Maybe they have also a "Prime Directive" (as in "Star Trek"): watch - but do not interfere.... ? Just a thought.
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Lugh
12. Re: n/t
legionromanes wrote: <( ....) > I can see > that several people here have a belief based (i.e. no evidence) > faith in the alien boogeyman. That detracts from the fact that > humanity and humanity alone has gotten us into this mess, not > some Alien boogeyman you happen to want to call God because you > don't understand science.. I's the old story (isn't it always?) of loo
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Lugh
The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance. Socrates When you tried to find an answer and couldn't for whatever reason, it's okay to admit to not knowing. Tatjana
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Lugh
Hello, Ed! EdMalkowski wrote: > The Age of Science began in the middle of the 16th century with > Copernicus. > I'd put it this way: the age of HISTORIC science began in the 16th century with Copernicus. Imo, its hard to pinpoint the real start of science, as for me science means the want/need to investigate, to explain, understand and to a certain extend make use of nature and natura
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Lugh
Hi Ed! Your dog ignores pictures on TV because he cannot see them. His vision rate (not sure about the correct expression) is too fast to see moving pics on TV, as they are set up at 60 per sec for human vision, whereas a dog's rate is about 80 per sec - they are hunters and their vision just is too fast. You may notice that he probably reacts on noises from the TV (a dog barking, cat mew) as doe
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Lugh
11 years ago
Lugh
Well well (serious frown on my brow), you might be up to something...yes... let me just dive into the piles of term papers I have on the subject ... they must be somewhere here....be back in a minute
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Lugh
legionromanes wrote: > I always thought a henge was a primitive form of one of these< No, you didn't! Did you?
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Lugh
legionromanes wrote: > most archaeologists I have heard comment on it say it was the > cathedral of its day. who said that it wasn't ? My books at Uni said, most archaeos in Germany still say it. Though I have noticed in the younger generation a slight tendency of change... > maybe theres just a few in your circle that need their heads > bashing together Definitely. > I th
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Lugh
legionromanes wrote: > its only a tomb now because the people who would be worshipping > at it every winter solstice are dead. Yes.But why are archaeologists unable to recognize it (or admit to it) that is was /is more than a tomb? Answer: > guess its just dependant on your religious point of view and of > course which religion is still around calling the shots > > ;) >
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Lugh
legionromanes wrote: > I see your point but feel you are forcing a conclusion where > none is warranted > > the Basilica St Denis is the burial place of dead french kings > and queens and a place of worship > > Newgrange is according to myth the burial place of dead kings > and a place of worship > > both these cultures responsible are ones that venerate the >
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Lugh
Oh! Silly me, of course (here, the short for archaeologist is "arch."). And believe it or not: I do know a Husky bitch called Indiana and they call her Indy - AND a cute mongrel named Jones. Besides, I didn't think you wouldn't know Lugh (the god), I just thought the link was a bit o'fun to read .-)
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Lugh
I gave my dog this name beacuse he his almost entirely white and when the sun shines, he really kinda shines and sparkles a bit. AND because he is the smartest dog I've met so far (not always to my advantage).
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Lugh
What exactly is meant by "archaeo"? I'm not familiar with that expression. I do indeed know one Fido (German Shepherd) and I know from my stay in Eire that about 90% of all male dogs in the English-speaking world are called Rover - Tolkien made a little joke about that in his story "Roverandom" - great stuff!
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Lugh
I'm more into Star Trek, but I can tell you about pronunciation: in Irish, they're the Sidhe (plural form), in singular it's Sidh and both are pronunced as "she" in English. My user name, Lugh (which is actually my dog's name, is pronunced "Loo" (don't you dare...!), that guy was a Tuatha de Danaan, look here:
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Lugh
I don't know about rats, but I certainly know that dogs have self-awareness from countless observations with my own dogs. Present a young dog with a mirror. First he sees himself, he growls, then walks up to it (no sniffing though) looks closely, waggs his tail and walks away. Next time he passes by the mirror, he looks in and knows it's himself. No more attention paid ( doesn't have to check on
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Lugh
Thankx for all your answers, you all have a point. Now look here: and here: The first is a place that was constructed with the main purpose of worship - we know (at least we think we do..) because scripture tells us so. Yet we find extremley many burials and human remains in there...also the building is astronomically aligned in a certain way, there a lots of decorated stones and other orna
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Lugh
11 years ago
Lugh
legionromanes wrote: > at least you didn't do it deliberately like catholicism, > > ;) Naa, I never would! (neither deliberately nor catholicism) > the Tuatha are generally described as pale skinned with blonde > hair and blue eyes, Yes, but keep in mind that they were first described by Celtic people who were pale skinned with light eyes, blone or red hair - maybe the Celt
Forum: Author of the Month
11 years ago
Lugh
You're right: I must have mixed up the Fir Bolg (from Spain or Greece), the Tuatha (from the clouds or the north or both) and the Milesians (again from Spain). Hellish confusion. I'll be back when I've done my homework -again...
Forum: Author of the Month
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