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Thanks Glenn --

Those are some epic exploits! I know that area down by the train tracks at West Point, beside the river, and have actually parachuted into a field down there many times when I was on the parachute team there and we would use it to practice for jumping into the football stadium, for home football game days. The rock climbers also have some other walls that they climb, which are up closer to Washington Road. There's a lot of good granite there! But now they've built a regular indoor climbing wall in the gym, which they never had back in the 80s. I have a friend who was part of the mountaineering club at West Point when we were cadets, and many years after we graduated I found out that he was climbing every morning at a climbing gym that was down the street from where I used to live in San Mateo (in the SF Bay Area). So, because I lived so close to it, I got started climbing in that gym, which was a lot of fun. After climbing there for some time, I did my first real outdoor climb (he led) on a climb up Haystack at Lovers Leap in South Lake Tahoe, which was quite an adventure for me. It was a lot quieter up there than it is when you are skydiving.

The evidence you are exploring and documenting is very important. As you've mentioned, similar stone landscapes and alignments are found across the Atlantic -- and they are also found across the Pacific, in New Zealand / Aotearoa for example, and also in India, Central America, and many other locations. The worldwide scope of this phenomenon seems to argue either for contact beyond that admitted by conventional historical paradigms, or for common inheritance from some now-forgotten predecessor culture, or both. It would be excellent if you could help fit the sites you are finding into this larger worldwide pattern!

Here's a blog post I wrote some years back with links to descriptions of stone sites and alignments in India, which you might want to check out: [mathisencorollary.blogspot.com]

Here is a companion post which examines sites in Peru and New Zealand which seem to have some shared similarities with the sites found in India:
[mathisencorollary.blogspot.com]

A researcher named Petur Halldorsson has also documented similar stone alignments in Iceland -- you may be interested in tracking down some of his analysis to see what parallels you can find.

Thanks for sharing your work here -- I hope to visit some of those sites that you described the next time I am back east in the Hudson Valley area!

I'm sure your work will help to preserve these ancient sites, and bring greater awareness of their importance.

Best regards,

DM

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Welcome to my good friend Glenn Kreisberg, our features author for November 2018 2680 Graham Hancock 04-Nov-18 10:28
Re: Welcome to my good friend Glenn Kreisberg, our features author for November 2018 362 cliffrover 04-Nov-18 22:31
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