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The Osiris myth is one which most , if not all, on this forum are more than familiar with. However, most may not be fully aware of it's many guises. Jonathan Black's The Sacred History, describes the saga through the story of Cinderella - whereby the guests at a great ball are all somewhat hopeful of fitting a beautiful glass slipper. Osiris, we are told, is be-fitting an ornately carved coffer after this particular banquets many guests were found wanting - either being too tall or too small, when his evil brother and cohorts close the coffers lid. Hastily sealing it, and setting it adrift upon the Nile, Osiris' coffin washes ashore before becoming further entombed by the truck of a wondrously splendid Acacia tree. The King of Byblos (modern day Lebanon) is so taken by the trees beauty that he orders its felling so it can adorn the walls of the Kings palace. Isis, Osiris' sister and wife, bargains with the King and rescues Osiris from his grave within the acacia - thus resurrecting him. We're reminded of this otherwise perplexing yet pivotal point of the mythology within the context of the Star Wars franchise. Here we find our hero Han Solo entombed and frozen in carbonite, where he adorns the walls of a great palace - only to be somewhat resurrected by Princess Lea. There are many more subtle connotations concerning the Osiris mythology scattered throughout the original Star Wars trilogy which are discussed in the book. But what was the original myth referring to, if anything? Surely we're not meant to entertain the notion that Osiris was quite literally rescued from with the confines of a tree? And why the acacia? Once rescued, Osiris wastes little time by impregnating Isis. Osiris however, is soon dispatched of once and for all by his brother Set (Seth) who decidedly chops Osiris into 14 separate pieces. Once again, what might this mean? Set, it would appear, ruled quite comfortably until his nephew Horus comes of age by seeking to avenge the death of his murdered father. Horus, god of the Sky, thus overthrows Seth (Sith and the dark side) and our Skywalker restores peace to the land...

Richard

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The Last Jedi 692 RN Vooght 14-Dec-17 18:02
Re: The Last Jedi 128 Itatw70s 14-Dec-17 22:26
Re: The Last Jedi 110 RN Vooght 15-Dec-17 10:51
Re: The Last Jedi 78 Itatw70s 16-Dec-17 22:46
Re: The Last Jedi 106 RN Vooght 15-Dec-17 12:15
Re: The Last Jedi 81 Itatw70s 17-Dec-17 21:18
Re: The Last Jedi 82 RN Vooght 18-Dec-17 09:20
Re: The Last Jedi 82 Susan Doris 18-Dec-17 12:44
Re: The Last Jedi 92 Itatw70s 18-Dec-17 13:52
Nope 88 drrayeye 18-Dec-17 21:48
Re: Nope 69 RN Vooght 19-Dec-17 00:17
Re: Nope 166 Itatw70s 19-Dec-17 00:45


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