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D-Archer Wrote:
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> New Paper>

>
>
> I hope people have helpful critique, suggestions
> and/or questions.
>
> Regards,
> Daniel


Yep. It is pure nonsense, and nothing to do with science. Which is why it only exists on vixra. The properties of Sirius B, for instance, are well constrained;

Hubble Space Telescope Spectroscopy of the Balmer lines in Sirius B
Barstow, M. A. et al.
[arxiv.org]

Abstract;

Quote

Sirius B is the nearest and brightest of all white dwarfs, but it is very difficult to observe at visible wavelengths due to the overwhelming scattered light contribution from Sirius A. However, from space we can take advantage of the superb spatial resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope to resolve the A and B components. Since the closest approach in 1993, the separation between the two stars has become increasingly favourable and we have recently been able to obtain a spectrum of the complete Balmer line series for Sirius B using HST?s Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The quality of the STIS spectra greatly exceed that of previous ground-based spectra, and can be used to provide an important determination of the stellar temperature (Teff = 25193K) and gravity (log g = 8.556). In addition we have obtained a new, more accurate, gravitational red-shift of 80.42 +/- 4.83 km s-1 for Sirius B. Combining these results with the photometric data and the Hipparcos parallax we obtain new determinations of the stellar mass for comparison with the theoretical mass-radius relation. However, there are some disparities between the results obtained independently from log g and the gravitational redshift which may arise from flux losses in the narrow 50x0.2arcsec slit. Combining our measurements of Teff and log g with the Wood (1995) evolutionary mass-radius relation we get a best estimate for the white dwarf mass of 0.978 M. Within the overall uncertainties, this is in agreement with a mass of 1.02 M obtained by matching our new gravitational red-shift to the theoretical M/R relation.

Emphasis mine.
I assume you'll be replying to that paper in the journal in which it was published, MNRAS?



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 04-Apr-19 12:48 by ianw16.

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Subject Views Written By Posted
What are White Dwarf Stars? 989 D-Archer 03-Apr-19 21:18
Mod Note > Topic Moved 143 Dr. Troglodyte 04-Apr-19 00:25
Mod Caution > D-Archer 158 Dr. Troglodyte 04-Apr-19 00:27
Re: Mod Caution > D-Archer 149 D-Archer 04-Apr-19 08:05
Re: What are White Dwarf Stars? 155 ianw16 04-Apr-19 12:47
Re: What are White Dwarf Stars? 146 D-Archer 04-Apr-19 19:51
Re: What are White Dwarf Stars? 157 ianw16 04-Apr-19 20:37
Re: What are White Dwarf Stars? 142 D-Archer 05-Apr-19 09:45
Re: What are White Dwarf Stars? 138 ianw16 05-Apr-19 12:41
Re: What are White Dwarf Stars? 141 ianw16 05-Apr-19 12:48
Re: What are White Dwarf Stars? 138 D-Archer 05-Apr-19 13:04
Re: What are White Dwarf Stars? 145 ianw16 05-Apr-19 13:11
Re: What are White Dwarf Stars? 140 D-Archer 06-Apr-19 09:07
Re: What are White Dwarf Stars? 150 ianw16 06-Apr-19 20:42
Re: What are White Dwarf Stars? 137 D-Archer 07-Apr-19 08:55
Re: What are White Dwarf Stars? 212 ianw16 07-Apr-19 11:19
Re: What are White Dwarf Stars? 142 jeffreyw 05-Apr-19 18:58
Re: What are White Dwarf Stars? 145 ianw16 05-Apr-19 19:07
Re: What are White Dwarf Stars? 141 D-Archer 06-Apr-19 09:11
Re: What are White Dwarf Stars? 147 ianw16 06-Apr-19 20:51
Re: What are White Dwarf Stars? 143 D-Archer 07-Apr-19 08:57
Re: What are White Dwarf Stars? 134 ianw16 07-Apr-19 10:55


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