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Hi Javier,

Regarding "Three Versions of Judas" and your comments .....

Borgesian use of symbolism is incredibly amazing. It seems to have a way of coalescing from different religions and cultures and yet it still has a particularly Argentinian or South American flavor. How he does that is a marvel of intellectual and academic rigor combined with a great flair for using scholarship in a creative, original fashion.

As regards the symbology of Nils Runeberg's name, in itself, your info is most helpful, along with the way Borges combines or discombines the ancient Celtic symbology and the Christian, as per the wheel and the cross. As to the serpent, I'm not sure. I'll go back and look later.

However, now we need to look at Runeberg's character qua character, as a theological personage of the early twentieth century in Lund. (Where is Lund? I need to find out.) Anyway, by his actions and reactions, we can gather the seeds of his character and grow a plant that may or may not flower as Runeberg had intended.

The questions arise as to what kind of scholar he is, how honest both to himself and others, how dedicated to the truth or purity of his religion, i.e. Christianity, and the Church approved doctrine regarding Judas and why his betrayal was necessary.

After seeking the answers to the question of Runeberg's character, we can then ask the question of Borges. Ask where Borges places the focus of the irony, that is. Is it on Runeberg, who could have found a place among the Gnostics in Alexandria of the second century, where sects differed and contradicted themselves, even to the point that even one minor Gnostic was interpreted differently? Is it on the way Runeberg first interprets the nature of Judas' betrayal and what he sees a problem in the dogma and then his subsequent reactions? Or is it on the Church and the dogma itself? How we see Borges place the irony and remark on the characters and the symbols is the key to unlocking the story and the quintessential Borges.

Do you see where I'm going with these questions?

ananda

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Subject Views Written By Posted
Borges on Jesus and Judas 783 ananda 01-Mar-04 22:44
Re: Borges on Jesus and Judas 175 Briffits 01-Mar-04 23:52
A little on Runeberg and his "superfluous Judas" argument 172 ananda 02-Mar-04 01:58
Re: A little on Runeberg and his "superfluous Judas" argument 148 Briffits 02-Mar-04 08:54
Yes, Runeberg is a fictional creation 164 ananda 02-Mar-04 13:24
Re: Yes, Runeberg is a fictional creation 152 javier 02-Mar-04 17:46
Re: Yes, Runeberg is a fictional creation 196 ananda 02-Mar-04 20:29
Lund is in Sweden, /t 253 Briffits 02-Mar-04 20:38
Re: Lund is in Sweden, /t 173 ananda 02-Mar-04 21:47
Re: Lund is in Sweden, /t 236 Briffits 02-Mar-04 22:09
Re: Lund is in Sweden, /t 173 javier 03-Mar-04 12:04
Lund is in Sweden, n/t 143 Briffits 02-Mar-04 20:38
Re: Borges on Jesus and Judas 156 Melusine 04-Mar-04 02:04
Re: Borges on Jesus and Judas 148 timewaster 04-Mar-04 03:29
Re: Borges on Jesus and Judas 155 ananda 04-Mar-04 12:52
Re: Borges on Jesus and Judas 165 Bent 04-Mar-04 16:43
Re: Borges on Jesus and Judas 135 ananda 04-Mar-04 17:03
Re: Borges on Jesus and Judas 160 Bent 04-Mar-04 17:14
Re: Borges on Jesus and Judas 194 ananda 04-Mar-04 18:09
Re: Borges on Jesus and Judas 239 Bent 04-Mar-04 18:22


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