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I have been watching a Nexus presentation By David Hatcher Childress - Breathtaking Ancient Technology that leaves us Awe Struck. [www.youtube.com]

I do not want to appear critical of Hatches Childress’s work but it amazes me that he presents so many anomalies but offers no explanation for them.



We have ancient 1,000 tonne stone blocks, smaller ones weighing hundreds of tonne that are perched atop a mountain ridge, stairs cut into the side of a cliff that are up-side-down and keystone cuts in stone that are standing vertical.



There are stone wheels before the invention of the wheel, doorways that lead into a solid cliff-face and precision stone cutting that would be completely impossible with the pre-iron age tools that existed at the time.



There are elongated skulls, ancient pottery with cuneiform writing and Egyptian hieroglyphs found in the Americas. And there are South American stone carvings that depict the physical features of African and Asian people.

The above images are only a small selection of the clips provided in the 93 minute presentation of Hatcher Childress. And there is probably nothing in his presentation not already known to the followers of this forum. What is surprising to me is that there was absolutely no explanation given for these anomalies.

It is my view that none of the usual explanations (aliens, lost civilisations etc.) can possibly explain these mysteries.

If however we think of earth as a living entity – with a genetic structure such as our own – then maybe these anomalies make sense. Maybe ‘out of place artefacts’ are similar to ‘out of place genes’.

A good example of what I mean are the transposable elements we find in eukaryotic cells.

Transposable Elements
Quote
from Wikipedia:
A transposable element (TE or transposon) is a DNA sequence that can change its position within a genome, sometimes creating or reversing mutations and altering the cell's genetic identity and genome size. Transposition often results in duplication of the TE. Barbara McClintock's discovery of these jumping genes earned her a Nobel Prize in 1983.
Transposable elements make up a large fraction of the genome and are responsible for much of the mass of DNA in a eukaryotic cell. It has been shown that TEs are important in genome function and evolution. In Oxytricha, which has a unique genetic system, these elements play a critical role in development. Transposons are also very useful to researchers as a means to alter DNA inside a living organism. …

The following – also from Wikipedia is interesting – especially the more than 30 years delay in recognising McClintock’s work.
Quote
from Wikipedia:
Barbara McClintock discovered the first TEs in maize (Zea mays) at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York. McClintock was experimenting with maize plants that had broken chromosomes.
In the winter of 1944–1945, McClintock planted corn kernels that were self-pollinated, meaning that the silk (style) of the flower received pollen from its own anther. These kernels came from a long line of plants that had been self-pollinated, causing broken arms on the end of their ninth chromosomes. As the maize plants began to grow, McClintock noted unusual color patterns on the leaves. For example, one leaf had two albino patches of almost identical size, located side by side on the leaf. McClintock hypothesized that during cell division certain cells lost genetic material, while others gained what they had lost. However, when comparing the chromosomes of the current generation of plants with the parent generation, she found certain parts of the chromosome had switched position. This refuted the popular genetic theory of the time that genes were fixed in their position on a chromosome. McClintock found that genes could not only move, but they could also be turned on or off due to certain environmental conditions or during different stages of cell development.
McClintock also showed that gene mutations could be reversed. She presented her report on her findings in 1951, and published an article on her discoveries in Genetics in November 1953 entitled "Induction of Instability at Selected Loci in Maize."
Her work would be largely dismissed and ignored until the late 1960s–1970s when it would be rediscovered after TEs were found in bacteria. She was awarded a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1983 for her discovery of TEs, more than thirty years after her initial research.
Approximately 90% of the maize genome is made up of TEs, as is 44% of the human genome.
Barbara McClintock discovered the first TEs in maize (Zea mays) at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York. McClintock was experimenting with maize plants that had broken chromosomes.
In the winter of 1944–1945, McClintock planted corn kernels that were self-pollinated, meaning that the silk (style) of the flower received pollen from its own anther. These kernels came from a long line of plants that had been self-pollinated, causing broken arms on the end of their ninth chromosomes. As the maize plants began to grow, McClintock noted unusual color patterns on the leaves. For example, one leaf had two albino patches of almost identical size, located side by side on the leaf. McClintock hypothesized that during cell division certain cells lost genetic material, while others gained what they had lost. However, when comparing the chromosomes of the current generation of plants with the parent generation, she found certain parts of the chromosome had switched position. This refuted the popular genetic theory of the time that genes were fixed in their position on a chromosome. McClintock found that genes could not only move, but they could also be turned on or off due to certain environmental conditions or during different stages of cell development.
McClintock also showed that gene mutations could be reversed. She presented her report on her findings in 1951, and published an article on her discoveries in Genetics in November 1953 entitled "Induction of Instability at Selected Loci in Maize."
Her work would be largely dismissed and ignored until the late 1960s–1970s when it would be rediscovered after TEs were found in bacteria. She was awarded a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1983 for her discovery of TEs, more than thirty years after her initial research.
Approximately 90% of the maize genome is made up of TEs, as is 44% of the human genome.
(references in above quote deleted by Robert Jameson)

Vestigial body organs

Above images from: 10 Real Deformities You Have To See To Believe – see [listverse.com]


Not only are genes swapped around on the chromosome but they are sometimes expressed. I expect this is necessary to maintain a link between the living body and our evolutionary past. Likewise I expect our living planet earth finds it necessary to express ancient buildings and artefacts in order to link our human consciousness with the greater universal entity with which we are a part.



Edited 6 time(s). Last edit at 22-Jul-17 23:57 by Robert Jameson.

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Subject Views Written By Posted
Living Body Earth 394 Robert Jameson 15-Jul-17 05:20
Introns 53 Robert Jameson 18-Jul-17 03:26
Biological and Geological Hot Spots 37 Robert Jameson 19-Jul-17 02:22
The Lock and Key Mechanism in Biology 31 Robert Jameson 20-Jul-17 02:43
Spliceosomes 18 Robert Jameson 21-Jul-17 03:02
Megaliths, mega fauna, giants and Messenger RNA 43 Robert Jameson 21-Jul-17 03:14
Meiosis 32 Robert Jameson 22-Jul-17 06:29


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